Why is Our Generation Refusing To Grow Up?

Millennials

A couple of days ago, I came across a TIME piece titled, Millennials are Paying off Debt but That’s Not Necessarily Good News. Within the context of this piece “millennials” were broadly described as people who are younger than 35 years old. Not surprisingly, millennials have less debt than people from older generations; however, from 2007 to 2010 we also cut the debt we do have more than people from older generations; e.g. “people” like our parents and grandparents. Nevertheless, the reason for many of these cuts is because, well, we don’t own anything except credit cards. We don’t own homes and some of us don’t even own cars (or driver’s licenses). An excerpt from the piece:

It’s difficult to distinguish the causes and effects of these changes, but they do seem to be tied to a gradual delay of adulthood: more than any previous generation, millennials go to school longer, get a job later in life and delay “adult” milestones like marriage, starting a family and buying a home.

Articles like this interest me for a few reasons: 1) I’m under 35; 2) The issues are always our fault; and 3) They’re usually grounded in negative results. Additionally, even if people under 35 are nothing more than highly-educated, net-addicted, narcissistic, hardly working, barely functioning adults, then whose fault is that? Guess who raised us? I’ll answer that for you: A generation of insufficiently saving for retirement, highly indebted, narcissistic, over-working, so-called perfect adults. People under 35 didn’t land in this environment, this environment landed on us!

If we’re a problem, you created it/us. We’re just trying to adapt, which brings us full circle. First, we need to decide if “adulthood” is still defined by people younger than 35 by milestones like “marriage, starting a family, and buying a home” as the TIME article assumes. If true, then why is our generation refusing to grow up? If untrue, then what markers of adulthood are we using to define ourselves that have taken priority over marriage, family and home ownership? For that answer, I turn it over to you, SBM family.

What traits do you use to distinguish between a boy and a man or a girl and a woman? In other words, what is the difference between someone who is grown up versus someone who is still growing up? What milestones will you use to know you’ve finally made it into “adulthood”? If those milestone include marriage, starting a family, and buying a home, then why are you and other people your age delaying these achievements?

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  • http://twitter.com/leighvl @leighvl

    Since graduating, the only milestone that differentiates me growing up has always been similar to the one that shows me that I have made something of myself; this milestone being Wealth and my financial security. All of the other traditional milestones (kids, car, house, marriage) still apply in today's world, but in the end of the day, I can't consider myself an adult if these cannot be managed month to month.

  • http://twitter.com/Tonyoardee @Tonyoardee

    Im 22 and working on my PharmD while still living at home, the real world is much too hectic to even live off a bachelors degree anymore. Maybe 20 years ago a bachelors would be satisfactory but now they hold the same weight as a HS diploma, its just too risky right now to go out on my own.

    • Mr. SD

      Depends on the field you in tho..

  • Adonis

    I am all for correcting a problem I did not cause, because it is here & we need to solve it. So the new sets of kneegrows have less/new/different/more interesting problems to solve.

    But I am highly offended when I get blamed for sh-t I was not even present for.

    “Case N Point – Black men have failed Black women.” Go anywhere you want with that quote.

    Good jab at the parents who raised us Wisdom Khalifa.

  • cynicaloptmst81

    What traits do you use to distinguish between a boy and a man or a girl and a woman? In other words, what is the difference between someone who is grown up versus someone who is still growing up? – Boys/Girls are unstable and incapable of taking care of themselves 100%. Men/Women take care of themselves (food, clothes, and shelter).

    What milestones did you use to know you finally made it into “adulthood”? – Not having to ask my parents for ANYTHING!!!!!!

    If those milestones include marriage, starting a family, and buying a home, then why are you and other people your age delaying these achievements? – Marriage, kids, and buying a home are things that adults do…but you have to be an adult FIRST in order to do them. So, they can't make you an adult.

  • J.Crawford

    What traits do you use to distinguish between a boy and a man or a girl and a woman? Boys are still stuck on the Me apsects of being a Male, they are Naive about lots of things and more on the Follower movement than the Leadership campaign, especially in Sports. Too many want to be a Superstar but forget to have Teammates that you can Make Better, which further validates "the Man"; Men are more together on their Priorities, we are Providers, Protectors, and SHOULD be Role Models for Boys…..

    What milestones will you use to know you’ve finally made it into “adulthood”? Graduating College (if it's for you), having a Career or Advancing in a job verses having the same job position at McDonalds for 10 years w/not pay raise, making Sound Decisions and Priotizing as well as being Independent more than Relying on your Parents past the age of 23, and so on

    • J.Crawford

      If those milestone include marriage, starting a family, and buying a home, then why are you and other people your age delaying these achievements? We aren't in positions to Buy Homes, and as far as Marriage and a "family", that takes much Maturity and Growing Up. Being Married & having Kids no longer is the default to being a Family, nor is that "being an Adult", as all of that is Subjective. there is not 1 way only for that

  • Peter J

    Lets be clear, milestones change with every generation. My grandparents were married at 19 and 20. Nobody would want that for their kids now because the world has changed. At the same time, living in your parents basement is not a sign of adulthood. Now who is to blame, take your pick. You can blame the parents who sheltered their children from everything, and made the nest such a comfy and protective place that who in their right mind would want to move out. We can blame ourselves for not wanting to be married, pay bills, own homes, and struggle when we have other alternatives that are quite frankly more fun than doing any of that. We can blame a society that has been created on buying things you can't afford to keep the economy running and prove to your friends that you are an adult by your bills. But at the end of the day, our parents created us, we revel in not having to do what they do, but one day we will all be adults. The real question will be what does being an adult mean then.

    • J.Crawford

      Good points in your post:

      "You can blame the parents who sheltered their children from everything, and made the nest such a comfy and protective place that who in their right mind would want to move out. We can blame ourselves for not wanting to be married, pay bills, own homes, and struggle when we have other alternatives that are quite frankly more fun than doing any of that. We can blame a society that has been created on buying things you can't afford to keep the economy running and prove to your friends that you are an adult by your bills.But at the end of the day, our parents created us, we revel in not having to do what they do, but one day we will all be adults. The real question will be what does being an adult mean then. "

      • SMilez_920

        Agreed. But I think there's a difference between your parents helping you and sheltering you. For example think about how many grown people (30 single or with children) lost jobs and had to move back in with their parents for 2 years maybe even three. Or just graduated looking for work and handling school loans.Now of course that's different than the 27 yr old who live sin their parents basement because the cable and food is free and their not actively trying to change the situation.

        Why’ll articles like these overlook a lot of factors? I think the motive behind them is the sense of entailment that the older generation feels my generation has. Not all of the people in my generation are like this, but a lot feel that degrees (two yr, four year, certificate) are magic carpets. I guess the older generation looks at the some of the people in my generation as making no progress/ entitled and cast that view over the whole group, even the ones who are making some progress.

        • AfterMath

          I think this is a true statement. Its hard reading these articles and not getting the feeling of an old grandpa telling one of those "back in my day we had to walk through 4 miles of snow uphill to get to and from school" type of vibes. Its easy to just look at a small sample space and make judgments about people, especially if they're not concerned about the truth behind those judgments or the situations surrounding them.
          My recent post The PageRank Algorithm

  • SMilez_920

    The generation before us (our parents) are the generation of credit card debt, the generation that bought homes they couldn’t afford and had no type of real financial literacy, other than the few who learned it without the trial and tribulation factor. The previous generation lived in an environment were there were a numerous amount of jobs that only required a high school diploma, jobs were you could be trained on site, and a B.A. was the icing on the cake. Also most people parents moved out of their parent’s house for 3 reasons, they found a job in another state, got married, or had a child and their parents told them “you can’t bring any babies in this house (more than 1)”. They act like the last generation all had homes and their own apartments by 22.

    While I think there are certain mediums were we do see adults turn into children (Facebook,Twitter,Youtube), adult hood is more about how you do things as appose to just what you do. Anyone can have a baby or get married (16 and pregnant) doesn’t make them an adult or mature enough to handle the responsibility.

    Cont….

    • SMilez_920

      I’m 22, 2 jobs and working on school debt, networking, getting my finances solid and looking for cheap-free ways to get into grad school. Sometimes being an adult is giving up the small things (living in your own apartment right out of college vs staying with your parents and helping with bills in the house while you build) to get the bigger things (a good grip on your school debt, better paying job, better credit, more solid resources to live on your own off of, maybe even a house).

    • http://inanimatethoughts.blogspot.com Animate

      "adult hood is more about how you do things as appose to just what you do"

      Well freaking put!
      My recent post My 2012 gaming year in review

  • http://inanimatethoughts.blogspot.com Animate

    While those markers are good to determine adulthood they shouldn't be the end all be all. We millennials have grown up in a different time and things change. The job market is vastly different and some of the guaranteed "good job" either no longer exist or have been outsourced. Remember manufacturing was a source of many people road to the middle class and it many years of service usually. If you had a college degree of any sorts then you were basically ensured a career. Now…even folks with nursing degrees are looking for work.

    The economy has changed, college costs skyrocketed, and other things occurred. It's not that we haven't grown up, its that we have either voluntarily delayed some of the usual milestones and we aren't able to achieve other milestones in the same manner as previous generations.
    My recent post My 2012 gaming year in review

    • Southerngyrl_

      Off topic: Here in SC we have a nurse shortage. If I didn't have an aversion to other people's bodily fluids, I would have surely gone to one of the schools for a nursing degree. My Mom worked at the hospital and so wanted one of us to go into the field. None of us did. Now, I wish I had.

      Also, the best nursing school in the state is a 2-year college. At one time their waiting list was a 1-2 years for admission.

      But, this would mean the person would have to move to SC, but my view has always been, if worst comes to worst, I am going where they want me.

      • Smilez_920

        True: Nurses are always in high demand. But you have to have great math and sciecne skills.

        • Southerngyrl_

          When you responded I wasn't quite sure the actual skill level that was needed, but I did some quick searches and basically it seems like you just really have to pass the math and science classes. You don't really have to be a math and science whiz. To be honest, I know some people who graduated from nursing school who are neither, but I don't think that takes away from their skills as a nurse.

          On the other hand, one of my good friends is a nurse, but she came with a BS in Chemistry and a Biology minor, so I am sure it doesn't hurt. Her math skills are crazy too.

        • SMilez_920

          I'm not sure of all the requirments, at leats in SC. i know a lot of my friends here in NY who are in nursing school, I've seen some of their homework and just fall back lol

  • James Evans

    You argument is flawed. The generation ahead of you are more likely to be your siblings than your parents which makes them least likely to have "raised you".

    • http://www.singleblackmale.org/author/wisdomismisery/ WisdomIsMisery

      So by your logic, we raised ourselves? … Thank you for your insightful contribution.

      • O. Fash

        I think he is talking about Gen X

        • jandrewblack

          He clearly mentions the baby boomers.

  • DeKeLa

    Definition of Adult is "fully developed and mature" which deals more with the attributes of physical and mental development. Everyone that can reproduce and care for themselves is considered an adult, and legally that would be anyone over 18 in the U.S.

    What we define as "mature" actions would be making decisions based on sound rationale and owning up to the responsibilities of our choices. On the basic level, this would be able to provide survival for one's self and family.

    This whole nonsense of "owning a house, having a car, kids and marriage" defining adulthood is based on the previous generations spoon-fed paradigm in a consumer based economy. Our generation is more likely to challenge this status quo by thinking more about individual development and personal satisfaction then following the masses.

    By defining what is the best choices for the individual short and long term, is the best indicator of "Adulthood".

    • cynicaloptmst81

      I am in full agreement with this comment!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • http://www.singleblackmale.org/author/wisdomismisery/ WisdomIsMisery

      This whole nonsense of “owning a house, having a car, kids and marriage” defining adulthood is based on the previous generations spoon-fed paradigm in a consumer based economy. Our generation is more likely to challenge this status quo by thinking more about individual development and personal satisfaction then following the masses.

      This is a great paragraph. It is interesting that our generation is actually less likely to buy a home (or car) we cannot afford than previous generations, but rather than be seen or described as “fiscally responsible” or “prudent” or some other positive adjective, were described as lazy, immature and “delaying adulthood.” When in fact, it’s possible we are being more responsible in our decisions, especially fiscally, which is a very adult-like quality.

      Further, and this has always interested me, every generation tends to pick on the subsequent generation but in reality and statistically, every “marker” of improvement generally increases for each subsequent generation. For example, incarceration rates: down. teen pregnancies: down. Death by violent crimes: down. Educational attainment: up. Actually, about the only marker that’s stagnated: WAGES. lol As you pointed out, it’s interesting that two of the markers of adulthood are consumer based “home and car.” I’m not saying our generation isn’t consumer based, because we are, but it does seem – if our debt load is an indicator – that we are actually more financially responsible in our consumerism; some of which is forced upon us: Great recession; high unemployment; higher educational costs, etc. I guess that story isn’t as interesting…

      - sent from iPhone

      • Smilez_920

        Agreed. While I think some of our generation lacks common sense, I think the majority of us are trying to stay clear of the mistakes we’ve seen out parents or people in our parents generation have made.

        It could be going to college so you won’t have to work a job you hate even if it starts off with a little more money. Yes you get a job to pay the bills but it’s nice if you could do something you like I’m sure some older men didn’t love their manufacturing job, but it put food on the table… no shade) Think about the divorce rate of our parents generation, how many of them rushed down the isle because it was the right thing to do (no marriage shade, a lot of those people got re-married). Child care is through the roof, is having kids before your 27 might not be the smartest option forever one.

      • Uncle Hugh, BP

        WIM: "Actually, about the only marker that's stagnated: WAGES."

        And we can thank the Baby Boomers for that.

      • Southerngyrl_

        Hmm. Maybe it is because I grew up in a rural area, but my view is different. All of the people in my family (Dad's side) built houses from the ground up. The recession didn't really touch them. None of them had mortgages, ever. These are the folks that when they bought a new car (hardly ever) they had crazy downpayments and had it paid off in a year or two, if not outright. They HATE making payments on anything. None of them had college degrees either, but all had children who at least attended (most graduated).

        My Dad hated when people got a little bit of money and ran out to buy a new car. He'd rather you buy property. He is still like that. Again, it could be because I grew up in the country and we didn't fit the mold. Country living I guess.

        • DeKeLa

          I agree that this may not apply everywhere, but where I'm from (NYC) you are NOT buying land and building a house from scratch. But I agree with the principle of buying within needs and fiscal responsibility, which is something that the previous generation is just learning..

        • Southerngyrl_

          Yeah, definitely not happening in NYC. I think of property ownership as a perk of living in the country. : )

        • Smilez_920

          I live in NYC but plan on moving to somewhere around the DMV area (Maryland probably) when I decide to get a house. NY property tax is up there, plus the money you spend does'nt equal out to the space you get

        • Southerngyrl_

          That is definitely a better idea than trying in DC. I lived in the DMV for a few years and yeah, Maryland is probably the way to go if you want a reasonably priced house. Northern VA = crazy prices.

          I am not saying I will be in SC forever, but there is something to be said about a place where you can still buy a house for 100k (or under, depending on where you are). I saw home prices in Northern VA and almost passed out. Culture shock.

        • SMilez_920

          Yea I heard Northern VA is out here breaking peoples pockets. I would like to own a two family house and rent out the property as extra income, I know while a lot of people own homes a lot of people rent homes too. I don't mind moving south i just can't be in the sticks lol

        • http://twitter.com/Tonyoardee @Tonyoardee

          The prices in NOVA are ridiculous because FairFax county has the highest ranked public school system in the country

        • http://twitter.com/Tonyoardee @Tonyoardee

          You also have to look at the age your father grew up in, it was still industry inclined instead of an information inclined economy and inflation wasnt as heavy as it is now so anyone could have easily done that back then. Theres far more financial risk today then there was 20 years ago, you cant even file bankruptcy on student loans.

        • Southerngyrl_

          Not necessarily. Neither of my parents were college educated. My dad worked at a plant for years and then started his own business. My mom worked as an admin assistant for a LONG time and just retired a few years ago. No, it was not as easily done. We lived through the Reagan years too, which at some points had high inflation and high unemployment, especially for black people.

      • DeKeLa

        WIM, by admitting that the economic problems of today's society has hampered the lifestyles and choices of our generation is a regret and shame the previous generation does not want to own.

      • http://twitter.com/missFLorleanian @missFLorleanian

        Your article made me read and post a comment on the original article on Time's site. I never read TIME, and now I realize why! If any one cares to join in the very child-like act of Tee Peeing this man's house and throwing dog poo at the front door. Meet in all black at dust tomorrow (I kid, I kid)!

    • Uncle Hugh, BP

      I'll just add my cosign here and save myself some keystrokes.

      DeKeLa: "What we define as "mature" actions would be making decisions based on sound rationale and owning up to the responsibilities of our choices. On the basic level, this would be able to provide survival for one's self and family. "

      I think that is probably the key to grown up versus growing up. Owning up to responsibility.

  • southandthesea

    let's focus this conversation on (young) single black men. seems that (young) single black woman are light years ahead or closer to the goal of a completely managed, financially stable life (i.e. house, car, educational debt, credit cards, retirements funding, investments, will/power of attorney established)

    • http://inanimatethoughts.blogspot.com Animate

      Source?
      My recent post My 2012 gaming year in review

    • Uncle Hugh, BP

      House and car maybe. Even degrees attained. I highly doubt it on educational debt and credit cards.

    • http://twitter.com/Tonyoardee @Tonyoardee

      This statement is pure opinion, i know plenty of collegiate women with zero street smarts what so ever, like basic stuff you experience and learn from they dont get it.

  • https://www.facebook.com/AnthonyBrianLogan Anthony Brian Logan

    you are an adult when you when you accept the fact that you are no longer a child and conduct your daily life affairs as an adult. until then you are still a child mentally even if you're in your early 30's & beyond.

  • https://www.facebook.com/AnthonyBrianLogan Anthony Brian Logan

    alot of people that are adults now were spoiled by their parents/grandparents as children. alot of people cant perform basic household duties and they lack life skills because they have never had to do it until they get to be grown and out the house. whether it be cooking/cleaning or touching a circuit breaker/ changing a light bulb/ changing a tire. then some people are almost 30 and still live at home with parents or with roommates using the economy as an excuse or the fact they had kids as an excuse. but really its a way for people to avoid responsibility and stay comfortable as a child, fearing the real world they must face as an adult without the support of mommy/daddy

  • https://www.facebook.com/AnthonyBrianLogan Anthony Brian Logan

    a college degree and a house means nothing because i had a job as a kid. just because you have a job now and it pays you enough to attain certain material possessions doesn't make you an adult. it just means you have a job and you get paid a decent wage. a degree means nothing because it's just a sheet of paper. its people in their early 30's living at home with their parents who never had a job in their lives outside of simply going to school.

  • alexa

    TI live in a single family home, both parents are foreign. They did not come to this country or live in it with the same morale and work ethic as the parents blamed in this article. Yet I am still apart of this non-grown up grown up class. I think society is very hard to go against. It is much easier to do as one’s environment does. When I graduated with an Engineering degree in 2010, the speaker gave a very ominous speech. He basically told us that there aren’t as many jobs a there are graduates in the room. That it will be very tough for a large number of us to create this American dream we’ve grown to know should be the goal and the reason for attending school. Yet there is talk of Louboutins and Louis V, everyone who is successful in the media is shown to be uneducated, crass, and self exploiting and humiliation gets them these material things. These material things, as well as remaining childish at a technically adult age, seems to be the new American Dream, even though studies show that an adult is the married, home-owning scholar. You can only blame the prior generation for so long. I think the only way to change this- and change is needed as we’re in a very bad place economically- would be to consciously revolt against extremist materialism and intentional frivolity. I think it may be too late for the 18 – 35ers, but perhaps the children of this age group will rebel- as fresh generations always do- and say no to the materialism and overspending as an indication of “making it” in America. I have doubts that this will happen, but I can only hope for the best. At some point, much like many countries in Europe who have made centuries of mistakes and bad decisions, I believe we will balance out.

  • AfterMath

    Its funny to see how this article defines "adult". It seems that the word is always redefined to make us look bad and whoever's doing the talking look good. I mean if you got married and the marriage didn't last, then was the marriage the "adult" thing to do. Likewise if you got a house that's now being foreclosed on, or if you had kids that you now cannot support.

    I remember when I was a kid, it was that "big kids" didn't play video games. Then it was listening to hip hop, then it was going to parties, then it was drinking, then it was eating healthy. Basically, everything that my parents wanted me to do, they tried to use the excuse that I needed to grow up. Its funny.
    My recent post The Risk of Competition

  • http://www.OpinionatedMale.com Mr SoBo

    The economic landscape is vastly different, as well as the social landscape, morals, values, et al. Everything has shifted. Priorities have changed. Struggles and concerns of yesteryear are not necessarily the same concerns as today.

    In addition to all these things, I think the advancement of technology has played a significant role in this more than we realize. We live in a time where we no longer have to work as hard, or differently than our parents and forefathers. Everything is so much more convenient and is becoming more and more convenient as time passes on. No longer do we necessarily have to get up, get out, and get something. In these times, more often that not, the something comes to us via technology in some way shape or form. We no longer need to cook, we buy ready made foods, and microwave it. Its how we grew up, we knew nothing different.

    We no longer value an appreciate the value of a dollar, because for many of us, that dollar was given relatively easily. The blood sweat and tears came off our parents backs, which made life for many of us MUCH easier. We didn't have to struggle as hard, because they endured that struggle for us. If it wasn't for their efforts, their achievements, their hard work, their determination, their sacrifices etc that paved the way for us to live the way we do now, it wouldn't be possible for us to relish in this notion of delayed adulthood and responsibilities. They worked so that we could not only play, but play longer. Perhaps that wasn't their intention, but that is certainly what happened.

    Being an adult now has new meaning. Personally, I don't think we have a clue. We attempt to mimic what we think adulthood is (based on our elders examples) despite never having to endure the same flames that forged them to be who they were and are.
    My recent post Kobe Bryant: Good Teammate or Petulant Whiner?

    • X's Dad

      Mr SoBo, very well written and very true.

  • Ladybugassassin

    Your parents didn't have the great albatross of Sallie Mae hanging from around their necks. Some of them didn't even go to college at all and were still able to find good wage paying middle class jobs. I'm 36, but I see a lot of folks that are younger than 35 squeezed out of the job market with lots of school debt. Of course you can't "grow up" and have a family until you can support them. Actually, it seems like many of these grown up folks are making the very adult decision to wait until their prospects look better or not do it at all.

  • http://www.opinionatedmale.com cortonio

    <div id="idc-comment-msg-div-583013618" class="idc-message"><a class="idc-close" title="Click to Close Message" href="javascript: IDC.ui.close_message(583013618)"><span>Close Message</span> Comment posted. <p class="idc-nomargin"><a style="text-decoration: none;" class="idc-share-facebook" href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=http%3A%2F%2 Fwww.singleblackmale.org%2F2013%2F02%2F28%2Fwhy-is-our-generation-refusing-to-grow-up%2F#IDComment583013618&t=I%20just%20commented%20on%20Why%20is%20Our%20Generation%20Refusing%20To%20Grow%20Up%3F" target="_new"><span class="idc-share-inner"><span>Share on Facebook</span></span> or <a href="javascript: IDC.ui.close_message(583013618)">Close Messageplain and simple, the reason our generation is not growing up is because of the parents and teachers. How old is the average parent who has a 10-12 year old, 28, 29, 32? That's kind of young. How can you teach a child morals, values, responsibility and have it indoctornated in him when you're practically growing up with him. Sad thing is, is that it's a cycle. You'll see little brianna who's 13, her mom is 32, grandmother is 50. And that same–not all but that same 32 year old still hasn't gotten the partying and clubbing completely out of her system. Especially with today's social media, doesn't make it better for our generation. Dress apparel either, people don't really tuck in shirts, or wear belts anymore.
    The same with a lot of today's educators, nothing wrong with being young enough to relate to children and understand what they're going through, but a 30 year old teaching high schoolers just doesn't do it for me.
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    • MaggK

      Im 24, i teach 11 grade, what are you trying to say?!

  • http://www.opinionatedmale.com cortonio
  • http://www.opinionatedmale.com cortonio

    Maggk I am not pointing you out or singling anyone in particular. If you can teach 16-17 year olds at 24, that's great. In my humble opinion, I just think it's more effective when you have someone older and more mature. I've personally seen young women in their early mid 20's teach high school kids and all they do is try to flirt with the teacher because they see her as more of an older sister not a mother type figure.I mean if a 24 year old taught an 18 year old he's going to see there isn't much of an age difference. Thats all I'm saying. Keep up the good work though.
    My recent post Relationship Chess, Her Move and My Toothbrush Rant

    • MaggK

      I actually started teaching at 22! I've always had 10 and/or 11 grade… And i swear my age has NEVER been a problem!!! Yeah sure they can see i'm super young, they wonder how come i'm already a teacher, but really they don't disrespect me (i mean i'll cut them if they do ahahahah)!
      Actually the only people who disrespect young teachers are other adults (colleagues, parents, random people…) who dismiss our authority in front of our students because of our age. It's super frustrating!!!
      I regulate my students the first day of school, ain't nobody trying to flirt with me after that!!! And I'm SO glad they don't see me as a mother type figure because this is EXACTLY what i'm not. A lot of people want us teachers to replace the parents… Euh no it's not part of the contract!
      I think there should be way more young teachers, some of the old ones are SO BITTER, they are ruining it for the kids… It's a hard job, and there are days you just wanna punch them in the face, i get that… But when you reach that point you should just quit… We young teachers have that fresh energy, we have that hope that every single one of our students can succeed, and we LOVE them!!
      I'll keep up the good work don't worry ;) !

  • Rich

    So according to this logic: If i get married before I'm financially, mentally, and emotionally ready to do so; and if I have children before I'm financially, mentally, and emotionally ready to do so; and then buy a home before I'm financially, mentally, and emotionally ready to do so; these things make me an adult??

    I beg to differ. These things would just make me an overgrown child with a broken marriage, kids that aren't cared for, and a foreclosed home……

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003423577750 Ludwig

    Friends of the Library Book Sale: Public WelcomeFriday, October 26 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Saturday, October 27 from 12:00 to 2:00 p.m.Kendallville Public LibraryThe public is wecmloe to attend the Friends of the Library Book Sale. For sale are books by some of your favorite authors, movies, music, magazines and more for all ages. This time around, we’re clearing out the last of our videos and also have several complete sets of reference books available, such as the Time Life series of books, and a children’s encyclopedia set. A number of coffee table books will be available, and are new to this sale. Some of them contain beautiful work by well-known artists and others contain photos of magnificent sights around the world. All are great for display and conversations starters in your home! On Friday, you’ll pay based on the weight of your purchase. On Saturday, it’s the $1 per bag sale….all you can fit into a bag for just $1!