George Zimmerman Found Not Guilty in Trayvon Martin Case

george zimmerman found not guilty trayvon martin case

The verdict is in: George Zimmerman has been found Not Guilty of Second Degree Murder in the Trayvon Martin case. If by chance you’re unfamiliar or need a refresher, here’s what you need to know:

The fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman took place on the night of February 26, 2012, in Sanford, Florida. Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old African American high school student. George Zimmerman, a 28-year-old multi-racial Hispanic American, was the neighborhood watch coordinator for the gated community where Martin was temporarily staying and where the shooting took place.

Statements given by Zimmerman have indicated that on the night of the shooting Zimmerman was in his vehicle on a personal errand when he noticed Martin walking beyond the gated fence inside the community. Statements then read that Zimmerman then called the Sanford Police Department to report Martin’s behavior as suspicious, stating “This guy looks like he’s up to no good, or he’s on drugs or something. It’s raining and he’s just walking around, looking about” and “looking at all the houses”, although according to a police report, there was “no indication that Trayvon Martin was involved in any criminal activity at the time of the encounter”. While still on the phone with the police dispatcher, Zimmerman exited his vehicle, and after concluding his telephone call with police was involved in a violent encounter with Martin. The encounter ended with Zimmerman fatally shooting Martin once in the heart at close range. Source

SBM first wrote about the George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin incident on March 11th, 2012, when word was still spreading of the young Black male whose life was cut violently short while his killer walked free. We called for his arrest, and we’ve remained focused on Justice for Trayvon. But today, well over a year later, we’re in shock.

We’re still processing our thoughts about the verdict and what this means — particularly for the safety of young Black men in similar situations — but we encourage you to share your initial thoughts and reactions in the comments.

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  • Kimmy

    While I do believe that this was a grave injustice, it’s still more likely for an unexpecting black boy to be killed by someone of the same race. As my dad said to me, this is his concern as the father of a black male.

  • Zuri

    I’m disgusted, but not shocked. This only reinforces the message that black males are, still, in 2013, expendable. I feel for you guys.

  • http://goodguyswintoo.blogspot.com/ Zula

    This was a terrible injustice and a reflection of our terrible legal system

  • Douglas

    Call me naive, because I really did not see this coming. Despite the all white jury, despite Zimmerman initially eluding charges, despite the proven racist fabric of America….I was blind sided. Call me crazy, but I actually gave our justice system the benefit of the doubt this time around. The blatant disregard for us black men must inspire us to mobilize and unite to combat the forces so determined to exterminate us.

  • cynicaloptmst81

    The case was lost when they selected an all white female jury. The rest was just formalities. So, I wasn't surprised at all.

    All they saw in Zimmerman was someone who was trying to protect them. And, instead of Trayvon just stopping to let him know that he was just going home (as if he owed him an explanation), Trayvon fought the poor man who was looking out for them…you know…to keep riff-raff out of their lovely neighborhood. I mean, with those break-ins being commited by black men, they would've been suspicious of Trayvon too! That hoodie, skittles, and tea made him look so scary and dangerous! And, by golly, it's even more likely that the young man attacked this helpful guy cause he was high on marijuana which makes EVERYONE aggressive! Trayvon had no reason to be suspicious of or frightened by a "helpful, well-meaning" man following and chasing him around the neighborhood…asking questions he wasn't obligated to answer when he'd done no wrong! He had no reason to defend himself against him…he was just trying to help! -_-

    • cynicaloptmst81

      And, I won't even get started about how I feel about Obama's *quote fingers* statement. -_-

      To say I was disappointed in it would be a grave understatement…

      • Hairbear_FLL

        I live in Florida, and so was pretty invested in this case, and the precedent the jury's verdict now means within the state. I've had so many emotions regarding this case, the outcome, and the responses afterwards.

        What were you expecting the President to say or do?

        Mind you, regardless of how Zimmerman acted with prejudice and flagrant disregard for human life, the Florida law is meant to protect the shooter that feels threatened. And for some reason the jury believed him. So the problem is with the law, and its fallacies. The real change comes from changing the law or repealing it. As the President, it is his job to uphold the laws and the Constitution, and he does not have the power to overturn a law.

        So, it is what it is, and at least he spoke on this issue. It's up to the Florida citizens to demand our legislators repeal this law. Wish us luck. :)

        • cynicaloptmst81

          I would've preferred if he'd A) said nothing or B) just stated that the DOJ was looking into the case.

          But, releasing a statement solidifying the whole "do better so they won't think all blacks are bad in the first place" mindset was pointless and counterproductive.

        • Southerngyrl_

          Those speeches piss me off.

        • Uit

          I see your point but even that law doesn't protect everyone. Florida recently sent a woman to prison for firing warning shots at her abusive husband for 20 years. And implanting the idea that blacks have hold themselves to a stringent line behavior so that everyone else will relax goes against The Dream and is a set back in equality in this country.

  • cynicaloptmst81

    I feel so helpless. I canNOT believe how right I was in my comment above. If you didn't watch the interview of Juror B37, read this…
    http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2013/07/these-peop

  • Janice

    I just can't help replaying those events in my mind from start to finish, what if the colour was reversed..Trayvon was a 17 yr. old white kid and the shooter was a 28 yr old black male…would the result have been the same…I think not….js