Home Featured Why My Kid Will Only Go to a Top 50 School

Why My Kid Will Only Go to a Top 50 School

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Small image. Big deal.

Her: I’m looking forward to having a family. I wanna have 3 kids. Not looking forward to the labor pains though.lol
Me: Eh, I think my limit is 2. Since you’re about 5’9, athletic, and have good hair and I’m a strong 6’1 with slightly above average athleticism, I’d say they’d have a pretty good chance of gettin’ some scholarship money for college. Well, that’s if we got married and I unleashed my seed upon thee.
Her: You’re so gross. Boys or girls?
Me: I want me some sons.
Her: Well, if I have a daughter she’s going to Spelman.
Me: *Puts down bottle of Colt 45* That’s not your place to determine.
Her: Why not? I went there and my mom went there. It’s tradition!
Me: Tradition is for the Amish. Besides, it’s the man’s place to determine where the kid goes to school.
**Unnamed girl hits Slim with a pillow**

Aight, so it’s not the man’s place to determine where their kid(s) goes to school. Actually, I don’t think it’s either parent’s place to determine specifically where their child goes to have the best 4 years of their life. Neither of my parents graduated from college, so I didn’t face any pressure when it came time to make The Decision to take my academic talents somewhere.

If I went to Colgate, great. If I went to Columbia, great. If I went to RPI, I would’ve failed out but still great. If I went to Hudson Valley Community College, they would’ve beat my ass like I was 6 years old. So what did I do? I applied early decision to Cornell, got in, and called it a day. I just wanted to go somewhere that I’d be able to run track, get home quickly in case there was an emergency, avoid heavy loans, and not have to do an internship at McDonald’s on Wolf Road in Albany, NY. My parents just wanted me to go somewhere they’d be proud of and somewhere that would put me in the best position to be successful. They didn’t consider me going to college an accomplishment. They considered me going to a good college as the deer’s head on their mantle. So you’d think I’d do the same for my kids right? Wrong. Well, not completely wrong but wrong nonetheless.

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The higher my kid’s grades are, the smaller the list of schools he or she will be choosing from. So basically, if mommy went to an HBCU with rich tradition and Slimsha wants to follow suit, daddy’s little girl is gonna have to do some serious convincing unless whatever school she wants to go to climbs in the rankings. Her best bet will be to start applying for scholarships as soon as they cut the umbilical cord. If the E*Trade baby can do research on a smartphone, so can she.

It may sound f*cked up on the surface, but think about it. If Slim Jr. or Slimsha is at the top of his or her esteemed high school class during their senior year, then why not go to one of the top universities in the country and maximize potential opportunities? It’s a no brainer. And no, I’m not expecting my kids to go to CU or an Ivy, but they most definitely will be choosing from the top 50, 40, or 30 according to U.S. News or whatever the official source is in 24+ years (assuming stray seed doesn’t expedite fatherhood), unless they wanna go into a renowned program at a school that’s not in that list, their grades indicate otherwise, or they’re looking like a rock star.

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What about their happiness?

Telling my son or daughter that they have to go to a specific school has the potential to mitigate their happiness. Telling my son or daughter that they have 50, 40, or 30 schools to pick from gives them the opportunity to find all the happiness they need somewhere warm, urban, or other.

What if they want the HBCU experience?

They can go to UNC, Emory, Texas, Georgia Tech, or whatever other school makes the cut at the time. There’ll be plenty of blackness to go around and the immersion they seek won’t be too far away.

I’m flexible on a lot of things (pause), but this is one of those topics where it’ll be OD difficult for her — daughter or wife —  to change my mind. How about you? Will you let your son or daughter choose whatever school they want? Why or why not? If yes, where do you plan to send them? Could a conversation like this be a deal-breaker for a potential significant other? Anything else, as usual, is fair game for discussion.

Hey Slimsha, you got some mail from Fungwah State. I already shredded it though,

Poppa

P.S. There will be a follow-up post regarding this discussion at http://www.therealslimjackson.com on Tuesday. Drop in and check it out.

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Comment(237)

  1. I was just having this discussion with a friend. Although I'd like to think my child can choose to go to whatever institute of their fancy, I'm definitely going to push HBCU's (Howard specifically….if they choose Hampton not a penny is coming out of my pocket to fund said education). There's something to be gained from attending a HBCU which I don't think I could have gained otherwise.However, if Yale, Princeton, Harvard, etc. is going to pay for everything they have my blessing to ship out.

      1. I am a MOREHOUSE MAN. While earning two graduate degrees at Yale on full fellowship, it was always interesting to note that the overwhelming majority of students at Black graduate network events and charitable efforts were HBCU alums. I've heard of similar experiences from colleagues at Harvard and Columbia. HBCU’s have a tradition of developing high achievers by convincing their students that there was nothing that they could not accomplish. This has been so since reconstruction, when our people were only allowed inside ivy towers to clean up after others, and HBCU’s were the only choice.

        As for me and my house, We will be Spelman Women and Morehouse Men!

  2. eh, I get your point but you may want to tailor that idea to the academic/career interest of your future slimette or junior. choose the top schools in their respective fields, not just any top schools. what if they don't want to go to a traditional college but trade schools? culinary arts? mechanics? the idea is to help them choose places that will benefit them in the long run, I get it. but find places that fuel their passions, even though it may not be in the top 30, 40, or 50 or in the U.S.

    1. Agreed on the subpoint. That's why I said an exception would be if there was a school with a great program they wanted to go to that's not on the list. If they wanna be a culinary bawse or film producer, we'll be talking about a different list.

  3. I agree with you, top 50….we ain't playin no games! I live right by Spelman and Morehouse and those kids act like their school is a top 10 school, so I am waiting for the HBCU comments along with Streetz….I'll be back later.

    1. HBCU's beat that into us lol

      Rule #1 Thou school art the best school on the face of God's green Earth

      1. I can't really hate on them for that but it annoys me when people from HBCUs think that they are better than me cause they went to Spelman, it makes me want to pull rank on them but I typically just give them the side eye and walk away….

        1. that is so true! I know ppl from a couple of HBCU's who tell me i'm not adequate b/c PWI institutions don't teach you how to be great in a predominantly setting like their school did. Um, if you hadn't noticed, they didn't have to TEACH me anything. I lived it every day mostly being one of a handful of black ppl in my class.

          My whole thing is, can't we just all be happy we're advanced? (for the most part at least)

  4. I went to a HBCU (Morehouse College) for undergrad, and I am at a law school where I'm one of a handful of Black students now. I am convinced that going to a HBCU was the best decision I ever made. What would be the issue with her deciding to go to Spelman? Spelman is THE number one graduate program feeder school for African Americans of any gender. Statistically, business and graduate schools recruit heavily at the top HBCUs, because they have been shown that HBCU grads are the best. And I'll leave it there.

    1. HBCU grads are the best? Really? And I'm pretty sure business and grad schools recruit heavily from the top 50 schools too…..but I could be wrong.

  5. what you know bout that RPI? lol. i actually had a scholarship but turned it down for West Philadelphia…and my parents were the same way..just happy i went to a (good) college.

    the only thing ya gotta keep in mind (and i'm sure you'll have the SlimJacksonian Empire financially poppin' off)…but these top 50 schools and price…O_o

    i haven't checked college prices now, but i know a bunch of them are over 40K a year…by the time i have a kid or 2/3…the top schools will probably be past 65K…

    so unless PParker Jr is nice with the jump shot, or i work the school…lil bruh might have to hit a community college up first, get the AA and make sure he is down for the major he wants to study, and that he has a plan.

  6. Unless they're getting full scholarships, I'm not so sure they'll be going anywhere on my dollar. Daddy has to get out his dreams, too.

  7. A) Slim you know Duke should be in that montage **smh**

    B) You're going to be in troooouble

    C) And my kids will either be following in mom's footsteps as a Duke alum or another top 10 school. Not that I intend on depriving my kids of a choice… I'm simply going to do what my parents did to me: not reveal that not going to a top 10 school was an option I could express lol.

  8. Sometimes parents know best. My mother told me where I was going to school. I cried n threw tantrums, n still ended up at the ivy over Howard. But it was the best decision financially.

    If its not my alma mater, my kids are going where I can afford or they can take loans. I will not be a co-signer.

    **turns around n heads back to lurkerville**

  9. My parents didn't pay for mine or any of my siblings college education. I plan on employing the same policy. You wanna make it, make a way but Corey ain't cuttin no checks. That being said, I was close to attending a couple of HBCUs but you know black folk like to act stingy with the cash. In the end I graduated from a PWI and I'm doing aight. I'm actually glad about it. Me and my best friend were going to hit Morehouse together. He went and I didn't but after graduation we found out that white folks (you know, the ones who do the hiring) held well known southern stalwarts in a much higher regard than HBCUs. He would say Morehouse and they thought he was talking about Morehead St. He always had to follow with, "You know, the school MLK went too." I know the HBCU folks will get pissed at my saying so but the schools are underfunded, in more cases than not they are poorly run, and they provide NO preparation for the reality that is the corporate arena. It's black fantasy land. Don't get me wrong, they ARE fun as hell and I enjoyed kicking it at them greatly but i'll pass on the enrollment part.

    1. I must respectfully disagree to HBCU's not preparing their students for the corporate arena.

      65% of black physicians are graduates of HBCU's, 50% of black engineers, and 35% of black lawyers are graduates of HBCU's. http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/01/07/933668/-

      If anything, HBCU's are more than capable of putting out well qualified, if not the best, individuals into their respective fields of study/work. A school is what you make of it regardless of whether it is a PWI or otherwise. I know plenty of minorities who have gone to prestigious PWI's and aren't doing much of anything in life now. It's all relative really.

      1. The statement of ill preparation wasn't in relation to academics. It was more along social lines. How many people are really going to gain employment at a black owned and operated business and interact mainly with other black people on a day to day basis?

        1. I can only speak for myself on this but I know that my HBCU is a microcosm and does not, by any means, reflect on the reality of the "real world". We're not ignorant of the fact that we will be shoved into the deep end of the pool with the 2520 folk once we graduate. Like any other college student we're out here interning during the school year and summers at these Fortune 500 companies, labs, hospitals, etc just like everyone else.

          HBCU's are really misunderstood in that whole "social rearing" department lol Yes we have awesome Homecoming's with a smorgasbord of coonery but alas,Homecoming is once a year, there's not a party going on everyday contrary to popular belief.

        2. <blockquote cite="comment-313187">

          AfroPetite:

          HBCU’s are really misunderstood in that whole “social rearing” department lol Yes we have awesome Homecoming’s with a smorgasbord of coonery but alas,Homecoming is once a year, there’s not a party going on everyday contrary to popular belief.

          Right, that's what a PWI is for…

        3. <blockquote cite="comment-313187">

          AfroPetite:

          I can only speak for myself on this but I know that my HBCU is a microcosm and does not, by any means, reflect on the reality of the “real world”.

          When something is a 'microcosm' of something else it means it's exactly the same just on a smaller level. So, for your HBCU to be a microcosm, it would have to have a racial make up similar to that of the larger society it sits in. So I guess your HBCU could be a microcosm of 'Black America' but I don't think that's what you meant… lol.

          And that there is why I'd never send my kid to an HBCU. J/K – but I'm sayin tho…

        4. @Corey EXACTLY!! @ Afropetite I went to a PWI (Ohio State) and nothing….I mean NOTHING prepares you more to be long-suffering, patient, and to develop another "set" of social skills. No, I didnt go to a HBCU, thought about it, but I went to an all-black High School, and while I have to say that of course it is nice to be around a sea of black professionals, there is also something to be missed if you only spend 16+ years of schooling around only black folks.

          At a PWI, I was to get: 1. A top of the line education with free social, Corporate America "white man's"world training

          2. MONEY,If you attend a PWI you are more likely to get PAID because of the quota they must meet, and believe me, there is nothing better than going to school for free…*wait "I want to attend The Ohio State University", "Do you play football", "No, Im a girl" "Oh……..wait! Are you black?" "Why yes, I just happen to be" "Come on down! The next four years are on the house!"

          3. You still get to socialize with Professional blacks. When you attend a PWI, everybody black knows EVERYBODY black. Its like you have your own unspoken organization.

          Besides, if your concern is being around other educated, professional black American's, then join a black professional organization. A lot of black people are so quick to attend HBCUs because they are not willing to step out of their comfort zone. Yes, you will always be comfortable around blacks, but that does not mean you always have to make it a point to ONLY surround yourself with those of like mind and like skin color. I am all for supporting institutions that help develop blacks, but too be honest, there are things/experirences that black colleges do not have the ability to teach. Most of them social. Yes a lot of black grads are from HBCUs but lets be logical here, It is NOT because HBCU's yield higher black grads, it is because HBCU's are…..duh mostly mitriculated by blacks. That is like saying a PWI has the most white graduates O_o. Obvious much?? Honestly, unless you are on a full ride to an HBCU, the smarter choice would definitely be a PWI, dont short change yourself or your future kids, there is TOO MUCH to be gained if you step outside of that HBCU box

      2. I am not sure… but isn't it commonly said that over half of all African American professionals are HBCU graduates? That being said – this is PURELY a numbers game. Not to undermine the above facts… but I do not think those numbers are very telling – and I'm a numbers girl!

        The fact that HBCU's are capable of saturating the market does not speak to the quality of the education received…. So I am curious as to how you are defining and or distinguishing "the best" in their fields as opposed to what may really just be "the most"…?

        I would also disagree with the statement "a school is what you make of it". Perhaps you meant your education is what you make of it? A schools longstanding history can begin to change with you.. or you can "put it on the map" so to speak… but the quality of the resources available to you cannot be dwindled down to merely being "what you make it". For that reason I can understand people not wanting their child to attend certain schools.

        … I do agree on one thing though: it certainly IS all relative.

      3. In the words of Jim Jones, #splash.

        "65% of black physicians are graduates of HBCU’s, 50% of black engineers, and 35% of black lawyers are graduates of HBCU’s."

        This right here sums up the entire argument.

        1) Statistically speaking it is one of the dumbest things i've ever heard. It's a university that has 99% Black students, of course their graduates will go on to do something. You're not comparing the same populations. You can't do any statistical analysis by picking the pool of an HBCU and then comparing it to the greater population. It makes no sense. It also doesn't take into account that people recruit from these schools heavily because of affirmative action. Hey if you want some negroes, where do you go to find them? You won't go to a PWI because there ain't nothing black at UVA except for the trees.

        2) And this is really the end all, be all, of this conversation. That statement is over 10 years old and it keeps popping up on every discussion about HBCUs. If you do a simple google search for that statement above, you'll find articles dating back to 1999 using the same exact stat. That's the problem with HBCUs, they rest on a history, instead of building one. Thus relegating themselves irrelevant in a changing world. In 2011, the need for HBCUs has just about gone away, the administration and oversight at them is dismal, and it will take a government spending bill to ensure that they are open in the next 20 years.

        2b) If in fact, they are turning out some of the best in the world. Why can they not turn out the best educators, scholars and administrators to fix their own problems? What does it mean if the educated negro does not return to his own stomping grounds to improve those stompaing grounds?

        2c) This will also serve as my response to how I feel about HBCU undergraduate alumni, who go to Ivys and never go back to their school to share that knowledge. Carter G. Woodson turns over in his grave thinking of you.

        1. This and your statement below is exactly what I'm talking about. Throwing out your alumni status from an HBCU only holds weight in black circles. White folks don't know what you're talking about half the time until they google it or you over explain it. If ALL these black folks got these excellent careers and are raking in dough by the boatload why are there community colleges with better endowments? School pride, community pride, and ethnic pride are all great things but COME ON SON. Let's be all the way real here.

        2. Ok I went on a rant without reading Dr.J's comment so

          @Dr.J cosign (in a much gentler way though 🙂 )

          @Corey….cosign

          @Most cosignage

  10. There are a few things we must consider

    1. The difference between college and university.

    I would prefer my children to go to a college small classes and more one on one attention from professors. I went to a PWI and it was the best experience and would push my children to do the same. I visited the U of M and decided against a big university because I didn’t want to have 99+ classmates in Intro to Bio and have my professor know me by my number.

    2. School of thought.

    Colleges and universities are schools of thought they mold and shape us to think in certain ways. So if you want your children to think in a more conservative way find the best school of thought that caters to conservative critical thinking. If you want them to think liberal find the best liberal lefty school you could find.

    I went to a PWI private lefty liberal arts school in MN. So it’s more than likely I would raise my kids to be liberal and hope & pray to god that she/he chooses a liberal school like me. I know some people may not think about this because when it comes to going to college it’s all about where you could get the most funding. For me the PWI package was way more than the HBCU package. Like my mom told me “u got to hang your mouth where the soup is dropping”.

    And the only reason I wanted to go to a HBCU was to be apart of a sorority, hang out with people that look like me and party on the weekends. But my older bestie told me that going to school with people that you don’t like is beneficial when it’s time to get a job because they are the ones doing the hiring and college would be practice for how I should interact with them.

    1. <blockquote cite="comment-313178">

      Curly: There are a few things we must consider1. when it comes to going to college it’s all about where you could get the most funding. For me the PWI package was way more than the HBCU package. Like my mom told me “u got to hang your mouth where the soup is dropping”. And the only reason I wanted to go to a HBCU was to be apart of a sorority, hang out with people that look like me and party on the weekends. But my older bestie told me that going to school with people that you don’t like is beneficial when it’s time to get a job because they are the ones doing the hiring and college would be practice for how I should interact with them.

      Exactly! Thats one of the aspects of going to a PWI that you would not get going anywhere else, you learn how to interact with THEM. (lol at my capitilized them) Seriously though I would add tot this that learning what THEY consider to be tact in their culture is the only way you can make it to the top with them and then beat them at their own game

  11. you've got 20+ years to be persuaded. you never know what will change your mind between now and then. lol.

    i plan on having wonderful brilliant genius children, and i'd like my daughter to go to Spelman, but if she doesn't, she will be going top 10-15, depending. cause i said so. lol

  12. A bit of a tough one, but I'm inclined to agree. Regardless of what the kid wants to do, one of the top 50 would have a great program for it. Both my parents have at least 3 degrees to their names, so slacking was definitely not an option in this family. They didn't really have to say anything about the schools that I or my brothers chose, though. At the end of the day, after working hard to make sure that you have the top options available to you, you would be hard-pressed to settle for anything less. I'm glad you're not pushing for top 10. I went to the top University in Canada, and there are times I feel as though the only benefit I got from it was referencing the name on my Resume. Granted, that's partly my fault. Over here, it's really more about choice of program than choice of school. One of my last courses in Undergrad was Sociology of Education, and we discussed the current state of affairs whereby students spend $40,000+ for a University education and theories up the keister, only to then have to go to Colleges that some of our parents once sniffed their noses at in order to gain some practical skills.

    Anyway, back to the issue at hand. I imagine that you plan to sponsor your children's education. I paid my way through school, and would've probably not been down with my parents being adamant that my choice of school be in line with theirs, had there been some discrepancy involved. Most people I know have problems with their parents wanting them to go to particular programs & working towards certain fields. If it were just a matter of schools, there would be a lot less headache and near-depression. I'm just lucky that, as much as my Dad wanted me to be a Doctor, he's more interested in me being happy and successful in general. If my significant other appeared to be too rigid, then yes, it might be a deal breaker. We owe it to our children to give them the necessarily tools to succeed, ensure that they do their best, and the rest is up to them. Sure, I won't be sponsoring any clown college education, but provided my child makes a well-informed decision, I would want my spouse and I to be able to back him/her fully.

  13. I am willing to let my future children attend whatever school they want. I am definitely going to encourage them to study abroad because learning through traveling is an invaluable experience and it’s something that can’t be taught on a white-board or powerpoint presentation. I am also fine with sending them to a community college for the first 2 years because they’ll always have the option of transferring to a university. I won’t even be upset if my children take an unconventional route that doesn’t require formal education, such as an entrepreneur or musician. Some people have a strong passion or drive for something that eventually turns them into a raging ball of success. The only thing I will not support is the no plan agenda. Laziness is not a good look and this is where I will draw the line…and my future husband will be sleeping in the living room or backyard if he doesn’t hop on board with my stance on the no plan agenda.

    1. I don't think her goal was to ensure her grammatical correctness with the Archaic prose. Her point was made.

      Continue

  14. Alumni are delusional. Brainwashed into believing some forced fed misleading stats about their school that has nothing to do with actually quality instead playing some numbers games about the quantity. Congratulations, you had a lot of ni%%ers, so did plantations.. does that make them a place of education?

    I have the same problem with greeks: If you are so important why are you the only one that thinks you are important?

    Personally I think Slim set his sights to low. Top 25 for my kids.

    I am a proud person too. When we talk about home towns, I will tell you Hempstead is the best, When we speak of Islands, I rep Haiti with all my heart (even though we are only half an island). And When you talk about friends, I always claim to have the best money can buy… but when we talk schools. I shut up, smile knowing that I have a diploma than politely listen to the grad students school me on their more impressive accomplishments. Don't see why SUNY Cobleskill feels the need to go chest to chest with Oxford?

    School is like chex, easier to get the job when you have a big endowment.

  15. <blockquote cite="comment-313180">

    AfroPetite:

    I must respectfully disagree to HBCU’s not preparing their students for the corporate arena.

    65% of black physicians are graduates of HBCU’s, 50% of black engineers, and 35% of black lawyers are graduates of HBCU’s. http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/01/07/933668/-

    If anything, HBCU’s are more than capable of putting out well qualified, if not the best, individuals into their respective fields of study/work.

    Only Link that needs posting:
    http://www.universitylanguage.com/blog/24/average

  16. I don’t think it would make too much of a difference to me. I went to a nice University in Hawaii, from Chicago, just for the hell of it and then turned around and transfered to one of the top 3 Art Schools in the country( yes tooting my own horn lol) My mom was really laid back about my choice and I think I’ll be the same way. Unless they’re just on some underachieving type-stuff. Them they’ll get a nice shakin/talking to.

  17. Good post Slim,

    My daughters will attend Cornell Univ (just like mommie). Will pledge either Zeta at Rho Mu (just like mommie) (or AKA if they are pledging ONLY at CU, like future god-mother Daphne).

    There will be NO HBCU talk in my home. At all.

    Like my Daddie told me "you already Black, you don't need to learn how to relate to yourself. You go where nobody looks like you. The world ain't all black and it sure as hell ain't all women"-John Beverly

    My son will go D1 and pledge Que (like his future father, or Nupe like my brother;Iota is NOT an option). And if that doesn't work out, Law school like his future father…..

    Or whatever career he chooses. And that will be at an Ivy or PWI (university only, not a college).

    Simply put (God Willing) these are the options for the children bore unto me.

    Smooches,

    L to the J

    1. <blockquote cite="comment-313197">

      Lady Jei:

      Like my Daddie told me “you already Black, you don’t need to learn how to relate to yourself. You go where nobody looks like you. The world ain’t all black and it sure as hell ain’t all women”-John Beverly

      That quote is funny as hell…..to WIM anyway.

    2. Looks like you have it all planned out, down to their future father who it sounds as though you have yet to meet? They say if you want to make God laugh…

      1. The answer to your question is no I don't have yet to meet him. God already brought me to him.

        And I didn't tell God anything, I asked and He provided.

        Smooches,

        L to the J

  18. <blockquote cite="comment-313186">

    I have the same problem with greeks: If you are so important why are you the only one that thinks you are important?

    But important enough for you to show us love in your post! *What Greek pissed in your Cheerios this morning*

    Smooches,

    L to the J

    A Proud member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc Fall 93 #1 Rho Mu-Cornell University; Basileus TBZ

      1. I really don't give a care about the tea party or skinheads. You heard what I said. Now "eat some breakfast first"….Jay Z.

        *Fyi, my last comment to you about something YOU know nothing about*

        Have a good day despite the weather (depending on where you are)

        Smooches,

        L to the J

  19. *sigh* The comments… already. smh.

    Anyway, I will stress Spelman to my daughter. If she chooses to attend another school, she better have a full ride, because my money will not support it I'll support her, as long as its a top 10 school. My son, if he's an athlete, Duke or Ohio State or a school with a top baseball program. That is all… lol.

  20. I agree to a certain extent. I do want my children to have the freedom to choose where they want to go, as long as its a reputable institution…I don't think I'll care much. I also think top 50 schools provides a wide enough range that the child still feels they are making their own choice.

    I never knock HBCUs bc different strokes for different folks, there's pros and cons to both pwis and hbcus. however my schools endowment is in the billions—'nuff said and I DO know that positively affected my college experience (no loans after graduating, research opps, etc….not saying this can't happen at hbcus either). And this also doesn't mean that someone who goes to a school with more money is going to automatically do better or vice versa at a hbcu.

    The college years ARE definitely what you make them as someone else mentioned upthread, i think its important to find an environment you can thrive in and make it happen.

  21. Wow…..

    Instead of discussing where your kids go to school (limited to a narrow 10-25 schools?) How about just supporting their learning and allowing to attend a program that best suits their needs.

    I went to a small (before the merger) Engineering school, that isn't top 50 overall, but is top 5 in the entire country for salaries, which is something that I care about more. I was still able to pledge a Fraternity, interact with the the rainbow of people out there and still took down college co-eds like a shot of Devil's Spring on an empty stomach.

    It's less of where you go and more of how far you are willing to exploit your network for your personal advancements. I struggled very hard financially with school, so my Kids will see support for their program of choice, as long as they make papa DeKeLa proud.

  22. Top 50? yes. HBCU? no! God no.

    My son is 5 years old, we talk about him going to Medical school everyday. He agrees (for now) 🙂

    I'd really like him to go to NYU.

    There is nothing wrong with setting the bar or having high standards.

    1. This the funny thing though.

      Howard is considered the Ivy league of HBCUs, and it doesn't break the Top 100 in schools in the U.S.A.

      You can't be serious, lol. I'm not white, but if I was, I would bust out laughing when I heard someone from HU refer to their school as the Black Ivy.

  23. I think it's easy for people who don't have children already to say what they will do and the expectations they may have for their children(that are not here yet)….but, it's a horse of a different color when they actually get here….personally, I would never tell my kids where they should go to College…I think, that the college experience is a meaninful experience and therefore most of the decision making should be left to the child….and hey, they may not want to go at all….then what?

    The other side to this..is that you will be having a child with another person..who may or may not have different ideas on where the children should go…you cannot just disregard the thoughts of someone else because you think you know what's best for the children…..

    I graduated from an HBCU in Maryland…and would I want my kids to go there, NO…they can do better…it was good about 15 yrs ago…today, maybe, not so much…but, wherever they choose to go I just want them to excel…that is my only requirement.

    1. HBCU in Maryland?

      Spit. Morgan State, Eastern Shore, Bowie, Frostburg (lol), Prince George's Community College?

      That's too vague. Let's hear it Queen.

    2. <blockquote cite="comment-313212">

      QueenT: I think it’s easy for people who don’t have children already to say what they will do and the expectations they may have for their children(that are not here yet)….but, it’s a horse of a different color when they actually get here….

      Realest comment of the day!!!

      Right now I am just hoping that my kids decide to go to college. I will support them going where ever they want to go. Just please go!!

    3. But Queen isn't that the very premise most of our parents coming out of the 60's. That my child will do/have better than them. And with that came the guiding/gearing/preparing us towards what they felt was great things i.e., college/having good credit, etc.

      So I think it would be a fair assessment to say to ourselves (those of us that don't have children) that my child will go to x,y,z university etc. Because as parents (I would hope lol) we would want the best for our kids. Regardless of cost. Because my parents were like moving hell and high water to make sure the last 3 went to college by any means necessary.

      I guess to me it just makes sense to have the high expectations for our children, and part of that is us (now) saving for their college fund because we don't know what the financial situation will being 20 years. Thus preparing just like our parents did. So that I can sit here childless and say "my kid WILL go to x,y,z university.

      But I do agree on your point it is very easy to sit here and say all these things about our kids. But I also think there is a bit of reality in our thinking too.

      Smooches,

      L to the J

  24. I agree with Queen that it's really easy to send your fictitious children to a top 10, top 50 or even top 100 school. The cost of tuition at a top 50 school is averaging $52,000 a year, and if you're all making a lot of money (which I hope you are) then that means less financial aid and a heavier dependency on scholarships for your children. Let's just hope that you have a plan in place for how your children are going to attend these institutions.

    I will say that HBCU is not an option in my household.

    1. Exactly. We're already saving for the girls' college (2 tuitions at once, Lawdamercy) but we're not going to tell them about it. I want them to get as much free money as possible and then we'll fill in the gap.

  25. I really don't want to talk about HBCUs all day. And Slim is like Jay-Z, he been around long enough to know that these posts will cause drama, but that don't stop him.

    I will go a different route.

    I think that the assumption that my children need to go to college in order to be successful is a far out one. Especially as universities continue to rival the church in terms of being revenue based places that offer some fringe benefits. I want my children to have the knowledge and decision making skills by the age of 18 to know what they want to do with their lives and how to chase their goals. If my kid, (and this ain't gonna happen unless my wife is like 6'5", but hey keep hope alive), if my kid wanted to play professional basketball and wants to skip college, I would not be opposed if that was his passion. If my kid wants to be a musician, dancer, soccer player, cop, Marine, Electrician, writer, entertainer, fashion designer, or any occupation that doesn't require a college education, i'm cool with it. As their parent it is only my responsibility to present them with the information needed to make the decision to forego or postpone college. From there, i'm okay with any decision that they make.

    1. <blockquote cite="comment-313218">

      Dr. J: I think that the assumption that my children need to go to college in order to be successful is a far out one. Especially as universities continue to rival the church in terms of being revenue based places that offer some fringe benefits. I want my children to have the knowledge and decision making skills by the age of 18 to know what they want to do with their lives and how to chase their goals. If my kid, (and this ain’t gonna happen unless my wife is like 6’5″, but hey keep hope alive), if my kid wanted to play professional basketball and wants to skip college, I would not be opposed if that was his passion. If my kid wants to be a musician, dancer, soccer player, cop, Marine, Electrician, writer, entertainer, fashion designer, or any occupation that doesn’t require a college education, i’m cool with it. As their parent it is only my responsibility to present them with the information needed to make the decision to forego or postpone college. From there, i’m okay with any decision that they make.

      I'll just co-sign this rather than write my own comment. It's Monday, I'm feeling lazy. The only other thing I would add is to the degree possible, I would pay for my kid(s) college education. My parents did it for me – and although I didn’t realize it at the time – it was one of the greatest gifts they have given me. I'd rather my kids not start their lives off with $50 – $100k in debt in the name of pursuing an "education."

      1. "I’d rather my kids not start their lives off with $50 – $100k in debt in the name of pursuing an “education.”"

        Indubitably!!!!!

    2. Just dont have your kid go to college and act a plumb fool

      4 years of FREE education on a Football scholarship and graduated from OSU studying Undecided -true story Like how do you even do that?

      What happens if you get injured with that non-guranteed NFL money

  26. I never thought about this. I would want my child to make their own decision. Being me, I would ask the important questions as to why he/she would want to attend a particular school then go from there.

     The school I graduated from is great and all but I don't think it's tradition worthy so I have no alliance with any school. Lol…unless it's UF or University of Miami, then thats a while other story.

  27. My only stipulation is that the girls go to college. I can see we're already taking shots on this one but I couldn't care less about the name of the school. "I'm not going to college" is the only non-starter for us. I only applied to 2 schools, NYU and Oberlin. And I went to Oberlin because it was 8 hours away from home instead of 4. I don't want my kids to choose a school based on how far they need to get away from their folks like I did. Oberlin is a nice name to have on a resume (but really, not that many people even know it exists) but I truly believe that a degree is what you make of it. And in the DMV, it's more "who" you know than "what" you know. I've seen quite a few folks with degrees from "Top 1000" schools get cushy 6 figure gs jobs because of church and family connections.

      1. First to admit Black people in general. It's a great school, but they had less than 10% Black students when I was there.

  28. I agree with everything you said, Slim.

    This is not 1930. The only people in the country who think highly of HBCU's are alums, family of alums, and current students. A quick drive through the typical HBCU campus looks more like a high fashion prison yard than an esteemed institution of higher learning. I am sensationalizing a bit, but the fact of the matter is that for every 50 outstanding people who come out of Morehouse every year, there are 500 who don't even graduate. Like most things in the black community, HBCU's are more about style and attitude than substance. This is not a matter of being bourgie, it is a matter of knowing how the world works and giving a damn about offering your children the best shots at life. It's the same as choosing a mate based on physical traits and intellect.

    BTW, my father, grandfather, grandmother, and great-grandfather all came from HBCUs.

    -TBD

    1. Soooo not true…I can only speak for Spelman and Morehouse…but whenever i mention that I went to Spelman I get alot of respect from people, particularly white people. I attend a top 20 law school right now…sat with one of my deans at this event, ended up telling her i went to spelman…FIRST WORDS out of her mouth….Spelman…excellent school, class women…I get the same response whenever I meet with my professors in office hours…

    2. Soooo not true…I can only speak for Spelman and Morehouse…but whenever i mention that I went to Spelman I get alot of respect from people, particularly white people. I attend a top 20 law school right now…sat with one of my deans at this event, ended up telling her i went to spelman…FIRST WORDS out of her mouth….Spelman…excellent school, classy women…I get the same response whenever I meet with my professors in office hours…

  29. So much to say….not time for eloquent soliliquy…..so shall speak in bullets

    * When employers want to recruit black students they go to HBCUs. They don't go to white schools looking for black students.

    * The country will be majority minority in 10 years….so how does going to a white school teach you about the real world?

    * Since when did you need to go to a university for four years to learn about white people ROFL Sound like Seargant Waters wit dat ish.

    * Studies of executives and CEOs have shown that most went to small unheard of schools.

    * A PWI is not the right environment for everyone.

    * That ish you wrote about Emory or Georgia Tech being like a HBCU is laughable. Nothing is like and HBCU except an HBCU.

    * Nobody really cares where you went to school. Except school snobs.

    * In the DMV…..chances are the person doing the hiring went to Howard, Hampton, NC A & T etc.

    * Spellman and Hampton have more money than most white schools.

    Look this argument is old. There have always been black people that believe in self determination, self governing and black nationalism. Yall talking HBCUs. I know dudes that went to Afro Centric high schools. That's how we used to get down in DC back when DC was still black. We believe in ourselves.

    Then you have blacks that believe we have to depend on the white man and learn his ways to be successful. So we copy him and follow him where ever he goes. Move to his neighborhood. Go to his schools. And the funny thing is….soon as too many black people move to his neighborhood or go to his school……he switches schools and moves his home.

    The reason black people have so little in this country is because we are the only race that doesn't invest in itself. [email protected]@az will go to a PWI and then get mad when someone doesn't want to see a black doctor. I'm thinking big surprise….you black and you didn't want to learn from a black doctor. Now you want somebody to trust you. You don't trust black doctors yourself.

    I went to an HBCU and live in a black neighborhood because I believe black people have to elevate themselves. To me….if you not in a black neighborhood and don't believe in black schools you really aren't a part of the struggle. And that's fine. We all make choices. But stop trying to pretend you're just as black as anyone else. Actually you're not. If you choose to assimilate at least be honest about it. That's what I like about Asians. At least when they sell out they don't try to pretend they didn't sell out. They change their name from Xu Phong to Mike in a heartbeat. LOL

    1. Well, I went to a PWI but all of my physicians are black. I wouldn't have it any other way because I believe that black doctors know about blacks, their needs, their illnesses and their health issues with more compassion than white doctors. #imjustsayin.

    2. Your comment had several false facts in it, you should probably pick up a book and do some research before making blanket statements.

      Also you made a circular argument for and against HBCUs, when people do that, they basically are saying nothing.

      You are from Maryland, i'll allow you to say DMV since that's what people from Maryland do to associate with DC, but please stop trying to talk about what we did in DC. I been here my whole life, my family been here our whole life, my entire family since the turn of the century has been in DC, and i've never heard of these Afro-Centric schools you speak of. Maybe like back in the day we had Wo-se, but that was a small school that not a lot of people went to, the class size was like 20. In DC, we go to public schools, that's what we do. You go to Eastern, Spingarn, Phelps, Anacostia, HD, Wilson, Coolidge, Roosevelt, Dunbar, etc. You won't find too many Black people who fit into the same category that you're trying to speak of that didn't. The largest employer in DC is the federal government, over 75% of the people who work there went to DCPS or PG County public schools.

      I'm sorry, but i'm just lost as to what you meant, the false stats, and the slides you took at people.

      1. You said I stated false facts and then didn't refute anything I said ROFL.

        Maybe you don't know about afro centric schools because you don't travel in afro centric circles.

        I'm glad you can list DC high schools. You forgot Armstrong where my grandfather graduated. But I wouldn't expect you to know about Armstrong.

        I'm pretty sure everyone knows I'm from Maryland. I grew up two blocks outside of DC right on the DC/MD line. I went to school in DC until middle school. So I'm guessin I spent about as much time as you did in DC schools since you didn't go to any of those high schools you named. More like Cranbrook. Seriously…..I went to an HBCU with hundreds of DMV dudes and no real DC dudes joins frats. I'm just sayin. I know you think you can just drop the name of your hood and I'm supposed to think you go hard. But C'mon brah. I grew up bangin wit dem DC dudes just like I banged wit dem MD dudes.

        1. I don't want to waste time refuting your facts.

          My aunt used to teach at Armstrong. My frat brother did too, probably taught your grandfather. It's a technical school, by the way. Wouldn't have been on the list anyway, and there's sixteen public high schools in DC, I didn't name them all for a reason. Please don't go there with me today.

          I went to Wilson, by the way. And i'm sure you have some funny joke about that too. All i'm saying is, just don't speak like you are the authority on DC, when you 1) aren't from here, and 2) nobody knows what you talking about. I mean, QueenT would you cosign anything this guy says?

          We have a fair share of people from DC on this blog, and I mean no offense to you in particular, I just take offense to some of what you said in your comment.

          PS – Didn't drop the name of my hood.

          PPS – "But C’mon brah. I grew up bangin wit dem DC dudes just like I banged wit dem MD dudes." …. Tyler Perry used to say the same thing. So just in case you need one, #pause.

        2. Oh my bad. I grew up on the MD side of southern avenue. You know in the burbs. ROFL When you cross the street you magically transform into someone who can talk about DC. ROFL

      2. See I didnt want to say anything because I thought what he was saying may be true for DC and Maryland.

        I'm in VA… chances are the hiring person went to UVA or Virginia Tech. lol!

    3. I'm confused.

      Are we saying that any school that isn’t a HBCU is a "white school"? I have to live in a black neighborhood and go to a HBCU to define my "blackness?" To whom? Myself? I don’t know how black I am? I guess my mirror must be broken. ….the struggle? …seriously?

      Lastly, I hate when black people make this statement or similar ones, "The country will be majority minority in 10 years."

      For one, 10 years is inaccurate. It'll be 2050 before this occurs. Secondly, even in 2050, Whites will STILL be 50% of the population so I'm not sure what it really matters that ALL OTHER MINORITIES COMBINED will finally equal whites. Ummm, yay? Is it a celebration b*tches? – Rick James.

      No, not really. Also, for the record, even when this magical transformation of society occurs, blacks will still only be 17% of the population relative to the 12% they are now. Hispanics will be the top minority. “Majority minority” seems like an oxymoronic statement anyway.

      Honestly, these assertions seem like they came straight out a comic book – written in the 1960s.

      1. Race isn't genetics. It is culture. The degree to which we emerse ourself in a culture is what we refer to as our blackness. Condoleeza Rice might be genetically african but I know people that are genetically european that are blacker than her.

        About the numbers……..actually when I hear people say they go to white schools to learn about white people….now that is a comic book defense to mask a decision and the real factors that influenced that decision.

        1. I'm going to have to respectfully but adamantly disagree, pimp. Race IS definitely genetics. Simply because you choose not to define Condoleeza Rice, which is a strange example in my opinion considering she is/was a successful black woman who attained one of the highest cabinet positions in this country as a black woman, as not black because you know people “blacker than her” that are “genetically European” does not mean the majority of people, especially American people, would agree. To me, that entire argument doesn’t make any sense. It goes back to the timeless argument that African Americans seem to love to have about defining what is or is not black. You’re right, culture is different – granted that’s not what you said at first – but even cultural significance is subjective.

          Frankly, I believe the largest division in black race and/or culture is this very conversation. In my opinion, blacks are the most fragmented of all the races. Blacks spend more time defining who is "black" than defining how to succeed as a whole or even as an individual. That's detrimental and it always will be. Honestly, you seem to be arguing many of your own opinions as facts, and that's cool, but in my opinion that’s a flawed premise to begin with.

          Regarding your second paragraph, I assume you're referring to the comment section. As far as I can tell, Slim made no mention of "white" schools. I actually think your comment was the first to reference "white schools" in any capacity, which is why I concluded you're defining all schools that are not HBCU's as “white schools.” Again, that's cool and your prerogative. Technically speaking though, there is no such thing as a white school. There are only predominately white schools. Last I checked, there are only Historically Black College Universities. No other race has this afforded to them. Thus, I’m not nor will I ever knock HBCU’s but I’ll also never knock someone or try to define their blackness for them because they decided not to attend one or live in a black neighborhood. That was my main issue with your comment.

          Anything else I didn’t specifically address, I probably agreed with.

        2. I feel you. There is so many ways to go on this topic it is hard to cover it all.

          True…some schools are white and some are very diverse. There is a difference.

          I agree with what you said about the black community being fragmented. To me that goes to the heart of this discussion. Why are we so fragmented? We are the only community that actively tries to seperated from itself. Therefore we lose out on economies of scale. We don't control our local governments, buisnesses etc etc. Every other race consolidates and is able to build a finacial foundation. But if we don't even live around each other or go to school together, there is nothing to build on. Integration of schools was one of the worst things that happened to us. And integration of neighborhoods. Prior to the riots we controlled all the small busnesses in our communities.

        3. <blockquote cite="comment-313292">

          il Duce the Grand Nagus, Master of the Rules of Acquisition: I agree with what you said about the black community being fragmented. To me that goes to the heart of this discussion. Why are we so fragmented? We are the only community that actively tries to seperated from itself. Therefore we lose out on economies of scale. We don’t control our local governments, buisnesses etc etc. Every other race consolidates and is able to build a finacial foundation. But if we don’t even live around each other or go to school together, there is nothing to build on. Integration of schools was one of the worst things that happened to us. And integration of neighborhoods. Prior to the riots we controlled all the small busnesses in our communities.

          Ha. Good discussion. I agree and disagree with this post. I'm of the belief that if anyone is going to fix Black America it'll have to be Black America but we've got a LONG way to go. I think pointing fingers and the proverbial "crab in a bucket" syndrome hampers progress. But fam, we are about go so far into left field from this post's original intent it is ridiculous so I'll save this debate for another day. Hell, might even write about it (yes, WIM is always theme-stealing ideas with not nary a shred of guilt).

          In summation, I have no shame in admitting I have no idea. I'm sure if the answer was simple someone would have implemented a solution by now. These are obviously complex issues that have plagued the black community for years – with improvement of course. Still, I imagine they will continue to do so for years to come, too. Unless Obama has a magic wand (Pause) that he plans to waive this election season, which I highly doubt.

  30. I'm surprised to see how many people are saying they wont cut checks for their kids' educations. I wonder if they will be the parents that go all out broke buying Christmas presents instead of starting a 529 plan to save money for books and tuition? #hoodrich?

    1. RIGHT. i know how hard it was for me. i won't let my child go through that.

      …although i will be encouraging scholarships. lol.

    2. I'm not cuttin checks cause if I have multiple kids how do I justify dropping six figures on Yale for one and half of that for a state school for another. Level playing field in my household. You want to go Ivy? I suggest you get on your hustle. Scholarships exist. Jobs that pay for furthering education exist. The military (though I don't endorse it for paying for school) exists. Loans (once again not a big fan) exist. I don't see me dropping the bank on presents either. Not really in my DNA. I'll provide every opportunity I can for you to succeed but ultimately the choice rest on your shoulders. I hope you choose wisely. A lot of these check cutters sound like hand holders and coddlers. You can't expect somebody to grow up if mommy and daddy pay their bills until they're 35.

      1. How about just SUPPLEMENTING the cost with savings..in the event that they aren't able to get enough scholarships to cover the entire cost? There are better ways to "grow up" than incurring crazy student loan debt. If the child is a smart one, its an investment not hand holding. Helping with a person's education at 18 can not be compared to paying rent and utilities at 35. Come on now. And if you start saving for each child in your litter at the same age, lets say age 2, by the time each child matures to college age they will have the same amount of money set aside. so you wont have to worry yourself about being unfair. The same amount is allotted to each child. Ta Daaaaa! 🙂

        1. Kids are going to come to you for cash regardless. That's what they do. At the same time, I'm rolling with what my folks told me. "You go to school where you can afford to go." You wanna go to a $80,000 a year school that's fine but you better be able to finance it. My brother and myself went to "better" schools than my sister. But her education was FREE so it's all good. People are $100,000 in debt coming out of school because they had Champagne dreams and Beer money. Yo bad. I can go get financed for a 911 today. If I go that route paying for it is on me. Anybody able to get accepted at a school THAT expensive probably could have gotten into another well regarded university that was GIVING AWAY money. Ain't my job to look over frown folk shoulder and make sure they don't piss away THEIR life or THEIR money.

    3. my boss started doing this for the children in his family. they all provide contributions to the 529 instead of giving birthday presents to the smaller kids. I thought that was an excellent idea.

      he is also a big proponent for the community college system that feed into larger universities later. for initial basic classes. I never considered attending a CC prior but when I worked in higher ed for awhile and had some peers that moved to the CC system in their careers–I considered it also to teach PT; I def see the benefits they provide.

  31. I think ppl are forgetting how many HBCU's there are 105 excluding Howard Spellman Morehouse and Hampton and maybe two or three others who have passed the bar and are ivy leagues in their own right. The other 99 are not cutting it as far as resources, outside connections internships, financial aid, up to date teaching methods. I'm a communications major so the only HBCU I considered was Howard. It's in DC surrounded by other great schools and has connections. I can find alum from the top 7 HBCU in fortune 500 companies in top positions. Can’t say too much about the other 95 HBCU's. If HBCU's want to stay alive that have to find a new way to market themselves.

  32. I won't call people out individually, but can I just make a note to the people defending HBCUs. Not to get all in your huddle, #rajonrondo, but Spellman is spelled, "Spelman."

    OK, now you guys keep going. I've seen it incorrectly spelled at least 5 times today by different people.

  33. the hbcu slander is so very real. eh. it was expected.

    I will support my child(ren) in any decision they make. if its a free ride and in line with their career aspirations, they can go wherever they want. But as a HBCU alum and more than likely my spouse will be one too; we will advocate for our schools and our child(ren) will see the benefits in their complete upbringing as the family culture and experience will be instilled in them early on. Same thing with being greek. they will be exposed, so its not like they won't see the benefits. But I wouldn't force my child(ren) to do anything.

    oh and I wholeheartedly agree with Christina's point about studying abroad.

  34. Hey Slim

    Interesting post. Wrong, but interesting none the less. Your obsession with rankings is leading you to the wrong conclusion. It seems that your premise is to minimize debt and maximize opportunity. To do that you have to look at the whole land scape. By the time you have children a college degree will be worth about as much as a high school diploma, if that. Which means that the Slimmies or Slimmettes are going to have to go to grad school. Going to a top 50 college does not necessarily optimize the chances of success in graduate school acceptance. Statistically certain HBCUs are more likely to get you admission into the top 20 law, medical and graduate programs. Simply put, they recruit heavily for the top graduates of those institutions to create their diversity numbers, which in turn lifts the graduate school in the rankings of the top grad schools.

    So if the Slims have good high school grades, they will be likely to go to college on scholarship anyway. This takes care of the debt consideration. If they continue in their winning ways at a top tier HBCU (For our purposes that is actually about 4 schools. We all know which ones they are so there is no need to name names.) they will not only find opportunity to go to a top flight graduate program but also an easier road to get there. When you get to the grad school level you are competing against everyone as the schools try to make a diverse incoming class. At that point we are not simply discussing race as a form of diversity but also region, undergraduate institution school size and uniqueness of background. So the real issue is what college will maximize their chances of graduate school acceptance.

    If the Slims knock the ball off the cover at the right HBCU their chances for success are actually higher than if they had gone to a US News top 50 undergraduate school. So the reality is to minimize debt and maximize opportunity the right HBCU may be a better bet.

    Unless you are just being shallow and want another Cornell grad so you can start your own tradition. If so, just keep it real and say that.

    KIR

    1. All very true. I don't see the advantage of starting life with undergrad debt near 100,000. Good luck with that.

      1. Yes going to an ivy is expensive but your potential income is much higher than if you didn't. The logic is similar to the reason why people making 70k-90k as consultants/accountants quit their jobs to attent top MBA programs.

    2. Thanks for commenting. If the young one knocks it out the park and gets a scholarship, great. That's part of the reason I said 50 and not top 15. More opportunities for a full ride. Minimizing debt isn't the premise though. It'd be foolish not to think of it, but that won't be what stops them from going to one of the choice schools. The scholarship would help convince me to consider a school outside the list, but it wouldn't guarantee that I'd cosign it. No loans.

      "Unless you are just being shallow and want another Cornell grad so you can start your own tradition. If so, just keep it real and say that."

      I'm pretty sure I said in the post they don't have to go to CU.

      1. 1)I think you glossed over the fact that PWI Aide completely trumps most HBCUs.

        2)When did we start rating schools by the better grad schools they could get you into. Why not just go to the better school? At the end of the day, those impressive degrees on top of the HBCU don't make as much.

  35. I applied to state schools as well as other Ivy's and got into one Ivy.

    In the end, the only factor that determined what school I was going to go to was FINANCES. I chose to go to the state school because I had a FREE ride. Graduating college with $0 in debt is a pretty good feeling…for me at least.

    1. I feel this comment. I did the same thing. I ended up attending a UC school ( that happens to be a top 20) but have very little debt because tuition was low since I lived in California. My children will be able to go where ever they want…as long as it is free! lol

  36. I would only allow my kids to go to Howard, Spelman, A&T, Morehouse, Hampton maybe Del State depending on their major. other than that Nope look at some other school's because the other HBCU"s are'nt worth my money and my child's time.

  37. OK, I see where this is going… HBCU vs. PWI … next to BlackBerry vs. iPhone arguments, this may be the worse debate to ruin your workday over. I'm off for a few hours to save the world.

  38. A top 50 school doesn't neccesarilly equal money and success lol.Well if you want to be an uncle Tom house Nigga sambo then be my guess .There are plenty of Ivy graduates busing tables.

    Signed The Southern University Jaguar Nation

  39. I can understand parents wanting to have a say over their child's education especially if they are footing the bill but in the end if your child isn't happy because they didn't have a say in the matter do you really think they will give it his/her ALL?? *JustAThought*

  40. Let me first say, I didn't even read the comments because I was already fired up from the original post. I am a proud graduate of an HBCU. I didn't go there because of tradition or family pressure. Actually, I had never even heard of my HBCU before I went to college.

    Here is my problem with this post (and black students who attend PWI's in general). People are quick to endorse going to a PWI, or to attend a PWI, because they claim those schools are superior to HBCU’s. How quickly people forget when those schools wouldn't even let black folks clean their campuses, more or less receive an education there. Black people are always trying to get what the white man has instead of improving their own stuff! This is the primary problem with black folks. Maybe if more black folks would be loyal to their historically black colleges and universities, then the HBCU's would thrive and prosper. People always say what about the ranking, what about the notoriety, what about the future I want to have?! This is a load of crap. If every extraordinary black high school student, attended an HBCU what do you think would happen? That those kids would lose all potential, join a Greek organization and leave college 7 years later with a jacket and no degree. Actually, what would most likely happen is that our schools would become what they used to be, havens for all of our great minds. The same is true for athletes. Do you really think if LeBron had gone to Howard he wouldn’t still be in the NBA today? Greatness will thrive anywhere and slackers will fail ANYWHERE. If all black students went to HBCU’s guess what, Corporate America would have to come to our schools and find us. If all black athletes when to HBCU’s guess what the drafts would have to come to our games and campuses. Instead of jumping on the bandwagon, why not have the initiative to force change?

    It breaks my heart when I hear this kind of thinking. It leads me to believe that no matter how much “education” we receive our people are STILL striving to fit into white society’s images and standards instead of embracing who we are and what we can do. But then again, being the result of a PWI you probably believe that I am just antiquated. Lastly, personally I find blogs like these to be a slap in the face to all the successful HBCU graduates in the world. Please send this blog to Kathleen Cleaver, Oprah Winfrey, Andrew Young, Ronald McNair, and the countless other HBCU graduates you are insulting. Not to mention, Martin Luther King, Jr., Booker T. Washington, and the countless other HBCU graduates who made it possible for you to attend your precious PWI.

    1. Right!!

      Same scenario. This dude from Howard put out a report recently saying that the best place for blacks to live is in an area where blacks are only 30% of the population. He said by doing this we insulate ourselves from institutional racism. We get to benefit from the things like good retail and restaurants that are built for the whites. Basically he was advocating for us being some type of parasite that leaches onto whites in hopes of getting some him scraps. Instead of actually fighting the institutional racism and building our own great communities. I can't believe this is what the black community has come to. Happy to be a leach. He also said once the population goes over 30% black the white people leave. ROFL

    2. What you are saying about college atheletics will NEVER happen. It was over for recruiting talent at black schools the second the big white schools started raiding black neighborhoods. Exposure and level of competition will go a long way in determining draft spot (ie SALARY). There are no people about to risk money for themselves and their family to return HBCU atheletics to their former glory. Sorry. And quiet as its kept it is now and forever will be all about the money. You didn't think certain schools always have a top 5 recruiting class because of their strong academics did you? BOOSTERS BREAK BREAD!

    3. this isnt 1964

      that way of thinking is outdated and counter productive

      true or false?

      Barrack follows MLK to Clark… or Morehouse or where he went. Does he make the white house?

  41. Haven't read all the comments yet, but as an Ivy grad who spends a lot of time around Black Wall Street and Black corporate law types, I will say that on average the Black finance folk I know (…And by Black finance, I mean people working in the front office of major firms like Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, UBS, etc, not your IT guy or mail room dude) come from either an HBCU or an Ivy. Also, IME, the HBCU people (talking Howard, Morehouse, Hampton, Spelman, etc) have been working in Wall Street internships since the summer after frosh year, whereas the Black Ivy folk stumbled upon their gig or had a hook up. I remember when I was a senior at my Ivy, the Black kids who wanted to dabble in finance were scrambling to try to find some sort of job after graduation, whereas my friends at HBCUs all had offers lined up at top firms. Diversity offices from top firms routinely go to these HBCUs to look for candidates, and these schools groom their kids for these jobs. Whereas at Ivies, there's not really a push to groom kids for jobs, b/c Ivies pride themselves on teaching for learning's sake, not to "get a job"'s sake.

    My point is that HBCUs, depending on the school, may be the way to go if the kid is deciding between good, but not so well known schools. Moreover, many HBCU grads go onto Ivies for graduate education, benefiting from both environments. I just wouldn't discount an HBCU b/c it's not in a rank list.

    1. I agree. Everyone I know on Wall Street went to an Ivy, a NESCAC (Amherst, Williams, etc) or a HBCU. However, I'd disagree with the internship point. Everyone I know who's on the street now has been on the street since they were freshman

      1. Yeah…at my HBCU if you had a good GPA in finance you were almost guranteed a job in New York. The recruiters were there all the time.

      2. At my ugrad, only a handful of Black students (off the top of my head, I can only name three) had Wall St internships during college that then netted them a job. I loved my ugrad and I would definitely go there again, but from my experience they do a whole lot less hand holding at an Ivy than at an HBCU. In general, for the *majority* population and for the Black kids from money, that's okay b/c they have mom and pops or their countless other family members and friends telling them what to do to navigate college successfully. But for those of us from more humble beginnings, we are at a slight disadvantage. Depending on how savvy the student is, it doesn't matter, but in some cases I do feel like certain Black students benefit from the more hands on, this is what you need to do to get a job, wear this, not that, etc. moulding that some HBCUs do…

  42. HBCUs are the best schools for Black students hands down. Pretty much all stats suggest this from looking at what grad schools hbcu graduates go to, to looking at their career fields, to looking at their earnings. Not to mention self-esteem and ambition, etc. There is plenty of research on this. Here's just on recent example:

    Across three decades "…our results suggest that as HBCUs afford graduates relatively superior long-run returns they continue to have a compelling educational justification, as the labor market outcomes of their graduates are superior to what they would have been had they graduated from a non-HBCU."

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/63gq601620k99

    People want to compare HBCUs to PWIs based on PWI measures like # of resources/selectivity, but HBCUs are far superior on other measures that take many many HBCU students (who PWI's would have rejected from the jump) to the top after graduation.

  43. I think this post has more inflammation potential than writing a post that a black woman's place is in the home. I'm making these quick comments, and I'm out.

    I went to a PWI. Social life was meh, but it was a good education.

    <blockquote cite="comment-313245">

    QueenBinthestreets: Besides, if your concern is being around other educated, professional black American’s, then join a black professional organization.

    That's what I did (NSBE).

    <blockquote cite="comment-313213">

    Dr. J: That’s the problem with HBCUs, they rest on a history, instead of building one.

    Comment of the day.

  44. If you want your kid to go to med school, avoid NYU. NYU's pre-med program is known for being notoriously tough (but not in a good way) and they award such low grades to their students that many have a tough time getting into a good medical school.

    <blockquote cite="comment-313211">

    Mika:

    Top 50? yes. HBCU? no! God no.

    My son is 5 years old, we talk about him going to Medical school everyday. He agrees (for now)

    I’d really like him to go to NYU.

    There is nothing wrong with setting the bar or having high standards.

    1. NYU has an terrific Law program at least 40% of incoming associates at my firm are recruited from NYU, that and Columbia, Yale, Ohio and Harvard but NYU ranks #1 on the firm's recruiting list.

      1. Yes I know!

        Actually when im at the NYU law building in the west village I can feel all the positive, intelligent, scholarly, terrific energy…lol 🙂

        I took my son there to visit a few times. LOL #dontjudgeme #itsnevertooearly

        I say I want him at NYU but will it be? Not too sure, who knows? but I'm laying the foundation right now. He has a college fund and I am exposing him to higher education.

      1. Lol…you're crazy. I know of too many NYU pre-meds who ended up switching to pre-dental b/c the curve at that school was ridiculous.

        Anyways, this topic is funny to me. When I was in college, my mindset was "Ivies or bust" for my kids. Even then I took it to the next level and would only accept Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and perhaps Columbia or Penn…Now though, with more exposure to the working world and graduate level education, I realize that where you went to undergrad can be important, but in reality it's what you did while you were in college that truly matters. Ya, an Ivy degree can open a door for you, but if you have a 2.5 from Dartmouth and your competition has a 3.7 from Howard, it doesn't matter if you went to an Ivy b/c it's clear from your record that you're not the best candidate.

        For me, I want my future kids to go to a great school that is the best for them, can open the right doors, and also worth the money, b/c I intend to pay for their undergraduate education. All this fascination with ranking reports are nil, b/c to me someone saying they went to GA Tech versus Hampton means the same thing to me.

        1. Yeah I think someone above said it best. It only matters if you think it matters. I haven't met very many school snobs in work life. Most people could care less where you went to school. It's how you perform that matters.

          Truth be told many recruiters avoid Ivy league degrees for entry level hires because Ivy league grads expect big money and fast promotion. In short…they complain too much instead of being happy to have a job.

        2. Right because I should be happy that massa let me go into the house and not expect anything more right? Eff that! I made it out of a top University I want top pay!

  45. Since my kid is playing a sport, he wont be going to a HBCU (sorry yall teams are doo doo). But if he wasnt playing a sport, I'd let him fcuk w/ Howard or Morehouse (if I have a lil jawn she can fcuk w/ Spelman) but I aint riding for no bumblefcuk HBCU. No sir. I'd like my kid to go to school in West Philly though. I'm trying to start that tradition

    1. <blockquote cite="comment-313275">

      Peyso:

      Since my kid is playing a sport, he wont be going to a HBCU (sorry yall teams are doo doo).

      I laughed. but I understand! this reasoning makes sense! lol

    2. Well the HBCUs that win get recruited all the time. The league recruits the MEACC. Hampton, Howard etc. But your stats have to be real good. They'll invite you to the combine. Sometimes it's better to start at a small school than to ride the bench at a good school. If you play behind Reggie Bush you will never see the field.

      1. Howard doesnt win ish! lol Don't get me started on the MEAC tip. You would think they would because they are "Howard" but lol

        1. Yeah…..but yall have a few dudes in the NFL. Like I said. If you are really good and have good stats. The recruiters will find you.

        2. @Grand Nagus

          I agree with you I just wanted to say something not so nice and true about Howard lol! Please dont stone me yall Im just playing! *e-hugs for all*

  46. Whatever college must meet the needs of the individual child because there are plenty of students flunking out of college and/or going crazy while in college (wildin or literally going crazy), so just sending a student to a top 50 isn't necessarily key.

    As far as selecting the school for my child, I would hope we can decide together based on their field of interest, their major, and some other factors (like, the likelihood they'll have good mentors at that institution). Ivy leagues and top hbcu's cover a lot of the bases. But, I realize that if they chose a career that requires graduate school, the undergrad degree doesn't exactly matter as much as what they do while they are a student in whatever program where ever.

    1. And none of it matters after they hire you!

      Nobody cares where you went to school if you cant perform.

      1. ^ This.

        Perfectly sums up why I don't respect degrees. I've worked with too many people with masters and PhDs that are idiots.

        1. I work with people that I really want to ask to see a transcript because I don't believe they are PhDs.

  47. <blockquote cite="comment-313238">

    Smilez_920:

    I think ppl are forgetting how many HBCU’s there are 105 excluding Howard Spellman Morehouse and Hampton and maybe two or three others who have passed the bar and are ivy leagues in their own right. The other 99 are not cutting it as far as resources, outside connections internships, financial aid, up to date teaching methods. I’m a communications major so the only HBCU I considered was Howard. It’s in DC surrounded by other great schools and has connections. I can find alum from the top 7 HBCU in fortune 500 companies in top positions. Can’t say too much about the other 95 HBCU’s. If HBCU’s want to stay alive that have to find a new way to market themselves.

    I agree…..I grew up next door to one of those other 99 HBCUs and it was/is not up to standard as some of the other PWIs.

  48. I really wish I could sit here and say " I dont care what college my son goes to"…"I just want him to do well"…"I hope he actually wants to go to college"…

    But I'd be lying to myself.

    1. Exactly! What these people don't get is that their kids will be competing against parent who put time/ money / effort into their kid's education.

      The sad thing is the kids are innocent and they will be paying for their parent's nonchalence.

      1. LOVE THIS! I don't think many people realize HOW real it is…and either way, saving money is never a bad thing.

  49. 2 kids, 4yrs each, 40K/yr = $320,000

    All you have to do is put $1000 in the market each year for 23 yrs to afford an Ivy league for 2 kids.

    Stop being lazy and plan your shit!

  50. "You are from Maryland, i’ll allow you to say DMV since that’s what people from Maryland do to associate with DC…"

    Dr J – I know you like to bask in your DCness, but keep it real. For a lot of people MD means Baltimore and VA means Richmond. It gets tired trying to explain that. When I was in college the problem was kids from McLean and Bowie saying they were from DC. I can understand being pissed about that, I never claimed DC because I like being from MD. And frankly, little DC dudes were pressed to get up in Pretty Girl county anyway, you couldn't pay me to tell someone I was from DC. But DMV accurately describes the parts of MD and VA that surround DC. There's a big cultural difference between beltway MD and Baltimore MD. Music, sports teams, fashion, accents, etc. Nobody's trying to get "cool by association" by saying DMV.

    *walks off whistling Sardines and Pork and Beans*

    1. Don't worry….he was just mad at me and resorted to that classic "you're a Maryland Bamma" ish. ROFL

    2. DMV, term created by Tigger. It is his short form for "DC, Maryland and Virginia."

      But I mean, Teflon, your definition was actually one that I can respect. But even still I am the first person to tell someone, "You're not from DC, you're from Largo." or "You're not from DC, you're from Cap Heights." That's just facts, but I can understand when you're far away from home. Nobody knows what those cities are. So as long as they don't act like they're the authority on things DC, i'll let it rock out.

      1. I usually tell people "You're not hard…you just live in DC." ROFL Don't worry I know… "Who wants to be hard…yadda yadda….whatever LOL

        but anyway…..I speak about DC cause most of you all seem to be New York based. And not in the government busisness. Many times your comments don't reflect the DC fed culture.

        And I use DC and DMV interchangebly on this site. I think anybody that is not tryin score points realizes this.

        As far as being an authority on DC….ROFL….You mad say you mad.

  51. Very interesting post. And being new to the site, i'm pleasantly suprised. My parents went to college in Europe being that they're from the Carib, so ultimately it was my choice where my sister and i wanted to go. I ended up at Penn State and that's where my kids will be going, Hey it landed me a great job in the sports industry as well as a spot in Columbia for Grad school. Plus it's the best place on earth and produces the most well rounded students.

    Ok, clearly i've been drinking the PSU blue and white kool aid. But I def feel you. I don't want my kids limited to one experience. Many top 50 schools give you a great all around experience. I got to experience the mayhem if college sports, "black pride", great party atmosphere, and best of all, I got an awesome education out of it.

    So yeah, my children will have a list of schools handed to them for them to choose from. I may be biased, but *shrugs*

      1. i knew this was going to turn into an HBCU/PWI debate. I tried to stay far from that. That whole debate is just getting annoying now.

        Can't we all just be great?

  52. The fact that I just realized what "DMV" is…whoa. I was wondering all this time, finally got it. LOL.

    Anyway, I just wanted to add that people borrow money everyday…if you have a credit card youre borrowing money. So, if youre going to borrow money why not do it for your child's education?

    Lastly, Theres absolutely nothing wrong with planning what colleges your children (ficticious or otherwise) will go to. You gotta put the thought/intention out into the universe first.

  53. Its funny how this turned into the tired PWI vs HBCU argument. I think there are a majority PWIs that aren't in the top 50 no?

    I would want my child to go wherever they want. I would encourage "good schools" and known schools, but as long as they have a plan, I'm not mad.

    I thought I'd be going to a super famous school, but chose to go to the school best for me, and in the end was one of the best decisions I made, if not for anything for the people I met. Priceless.

    My main concerns will be funding the education for my children, trying to mitigate the loans vs scholarships, etc.

    If I have a son who can ball, I wouldn't even be mad if he went to Duke (and my hate of Duke is well known) if hes a PG, then def not Duke, but you get where I'm going.

    I just want the best for my kids, and will aid in advising on that decision.

    1. But honestly, these kinds of posts ALWAYS turn into a PWI vs HBCU debate with one trying prove which is better. I went to PSU because it was right for ME in terms of the experience that i wanted..That's how it should be for everyone.

    2. I kinda think that top 50 is like the Body Mass Index. Doesn't quite tell the full story for blacks.

      1. I feel where you're going but there shouldnt be a difference for races and education. I wont get into the socioeconomics of it, but I feel like regardless of what my race is, I should hold certain standards high when it comes to colleges.

        If that top 50 is based on the overall college experience than its most certaintly not "BMI" I dont think its one size fits all, but top programs are top programs for a reason.

        These studies are always segmented by majors, athletics, etc, so if you're a jock or a comp geek, theres a particular top 50 for you

        1. "These studies are always segmented by majors, athletics, etc, so if you’re a jock or a comp geek, theres a particular top 50 for you"

          Agreed.

  54. I don't think I would try and pressure my future children to go to a particular university. It has to be their decision for better or for worse. What I will do, is research schools with them, figure out which schools will offer them the best opportunities to get them where they want to go. I don't think I'd be cool with them choosing not to go to college at all but I might be persuaded if they could prove to me that they could get where they were trying to go with out it. Not go to school because they don't feel like it or because they want to persue some pipe dream without having any clear idea on how they're going to achieve said pipe dream is out of the question.

    I don't have any personal dealings with HBCUs so I have no opinion one way or another.

    As far as tuition, if I'm in a position to pay for my children to attend school, that's what I'm going to do. I don't ever want my children to feel entitled to anything, so I probably won't tell them this. They are going to get as many scholarships, grants and as much free money as can and I would then do my best to supplement that so they don't end up waist deep in loans.

  55. In this economy, I can't fully endorse the notion that "My kids will go to a top 50 school" and pay upwards of 40,000 a year. Going in to debt is not the plan. Now, if my said child received a substantial scholarship or grant to a top 50 private school, s/he needs to jump on that opportunity.

    This may be my Binghamton pride showing… "Smart kids go to Cornell. Smart kids with smart parents go to Binghamton!" Just sayin'

  56. your college selection is what you make of it. I know plenty of people that went to top 50 schools that aren't doing much…I also know plenty of people that went to smaller schools or HBCUs that are in the exact same position.

  57. Oh lawd lol

    This proves to be a topic near and dear to the hearts of many. Great points made overall though. I mainly threw out percentages to show that HBCU's aren't out here developing McDonald's cashiers and shoe shiners. Point blank, whatever we choose to do with our money concerning our children is ultimately our choice.

    I would hope my children keep an open mind when choosing a school, despite my ties with HBCU's. =)

  58. i haven't read any of the comments because i'm commenting from my phone and this site isn't phone friendly. so i apologize if this comment echoes any before it.

    i'm honestly tired of this debate. i learned first off depending on your major an undergraduate degree is pretty useless you plan on pursuing a graduate/professional degree. i've been in school with graduates of harvard, yale etc and they've paled in comparison to students with degrees from spelman, morehead state, howard etc.

    i graduated from high school with a 3.9 cumulative gpa and scored a 1380 on the SAT. i played 3 sports and had every honor you could think of. i received scholarships from college park, temple, uva, princeton. i chose to attend the university of maryland eastern shore. a lot of people questioned my decision but as long as my parents backed me i was cool.

    i doubt i would have made it as far as i have today if i chose a different school. people are quick to judge schools and the people who attend them because some schools have more prestige than others. well there are dumb a$$es who attend harvard and there geniuses who attend longbeach state.

  59. I'm still reading your comments between baking cookies but I just want to drop this real quick:

    I'd like for my kids to go to the best university/college of their choice with the knowledge that they are (for the most part) positioning themselves to be the best employee the degree can position them to be. The standard in America is to work for someone to be successful. I don't particularly agree with this though. Ideally, my big ass kids will be playing sports and/or music on full scholarship because quite frankly college is about paying dues. I know plenty of unhappy worker bees who hate their job whether they went to HBCU or Ivy. They look miserable like they didn't know what the fudge was up. This is the reality whether you're black, white,hispanic or Asian….
    While the kids are on scholarship I'd get that money together so they can learn a trade that will help with grad school tuition. I want make sure they can make money with their heads and hands. Learn that tax law so you don't pay any when you become an employer. That's the real American dream, the rest is branding.

  60. <blockquote cite="comment-313213">

    Dr. J: peti

    Those stats you posted do matter. The stats about the successful # of hbcu graduates that go on to med, law, and grad school…they matter too especially considering that a lot of people have misconceptions about hbcus and automatically assume the worse.

    I just wanted to post this 2011 link again…2011 stuff fyi. http://www.springerlink.com/content/63gq601620k99

    Lastly though, these stats and this link all address material things which are important, but there is also a lot out there on how hbcu graduates also have higher self-esteem, self-concept, and overall confidence in their abilities, etc. Which play out throughout life. These factors are also important indicators of why HBCUs are important (in addition to the positive rates of ivy league grad school entry, jobs, and $$ making that is also true).

    I don't have a problem with PWIs but I really don't like when people overlook the good in HBCUs while assuming and highlighting the worse cause most people already fed into that.

    1. You're missing my point. I see what you're saying. What i'm saying is that it is not an indication of any type of excellence that cannot be achieved at any other institution, but it's often used that way. If you're going to use it to dispel misconceptions that's one thing, but not to prove that the school is better than another.

  61. A seriously…..I keep hearing that PWIs prepare you for the "real world" where you have to interact with whites. ROFL I'm sorry I can't say that ish without laughing.

    Like seriously do they teach you how to pop the collar on an IZOD shirt? Or how to do a spot on valley girl accent?

    Like what are these interaction skills you learn from whites that require four years to learn?

    Couldn't you go to an HBCU, by a copy of GQ and rent Clueless?

    1. Its called social and cultural capital (Pierre Bourdieu) its what makes people successful and unfortunately its something you can only learn by interacting with those in power (i.e. whites) or from someone who has interacted with those in power. You can't learn it from just reading magazines and watching movies, that is why little Bobby comes out of the womb knowing he will work for a Fortune 500 and how to act accordingly and why little Malik may be smarter, and better than little Bobby but still has to work twice as hard to be recognized and get the same job opportunities. If popping the collar on my IZOD polo will get me 6figures then I'm poppin that ish!

      Someone earlier said, why do we always want white peoples stuff, because they have the money and the power and until that becomes a Black thing, I want the white people stuff! There is value to HBCUs and being in a supported by a Black community but that is not something that is exclusive to HBCUs. My university has about 935 blacks students out of 35,000 total, yet we have one of the best African American Studies programs in the nation and a strong, proud black community. It is there that I learned about and truly embraced my blackness, while I simultaneously learned what it takes to co-exsist and compete with whites as well. In order for us Black folks to rise to power we have to play the game first. I want my child(ren) to go to an institution like mine where they can get the best of both worlds, not just one.

      1. OK. I made jokes but I was asking this question seriously. For the record, all my IZOD shirts fit snuggly and the collar is usually popped for preppy effect. LOL

        I kinda see what your saying. But I mean…I just would never think I was gonna learn any of that from being around white kids. I would think I would learn it from being around wealthy black adults.

        Honestly I just don't think I was raised to believe there was something I needed to learn that could only be obtained through white people.

        I mean I've been in the workforce now for over 10 years and there is nothing that I've learned that going to school with white kids would have taught me. Most of what I have learned has just come from expierience or from a black mentor.

        1. And I'm willing to bet your Black mentor learned it from some white guy….we didn't just come off the plantations and out of colonialism knowing how to make it in Western society, it was learned behavior. Not all Black kids have mentors like you do, I went to school with plenty of Black kids who had no one to connect them the cultural/social capital needed. Even NOI people go to PWI's, why? because they know in order to take over the world we need to know everything possible about the white world.

          Plus as my homegirl Kema said its fun and interesting to interact with people from all different walks of life, I don't like being in a monochrome environment, which is why I have to leave the SWATs at least once a week and venture up north to Buckhead/Five Points/Midotwn etc

        2. I've always felt that we don't need to learn their ways 100%.

          I think there is much of their culture that I would never want to appropriate into my own.

          I think we tend to ascribe a power and mistique to the white man and western culture that is undeserved.

        3. We don't need to imitate 100% of their ways but we do need to know them. I think that their power is somewhat undeserved but you can't deny it, they are some powerful MFs

      2. Yeah. The "real world" argument for attending a PWI is weak. Being around white people don't teach you about the "real world." Being in the "real world" teaches you about the real world. So, most of the people who skipped undergrad and started jobs already have a head-start.

        I just don't see the need to align myself one way or the other based on the racial demographics of a school. Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't that display racial prejudice? Just saying…

        But I disagree with the "social capital" analysis as well. That's just mumbo-jumbo for not being yourself. The most successful people are the ones who are great enough so they don't have to fake it. I've seen people change up in the presence of white people. H*e I'm your equal! I'll be myself all the time, with tact. If the general white population doesn't agree with it, so what? If black people don't agree with what I do, so what? Eff fitting in… I got over that during early grade school.

        1. By all means be yourself, but you see that "with tact" that you speak of, that sir is cultural/social capital at work. Its not about fitting in, who gives two squirts of pee about fitting in as long as you are happy with yourself and comfortable in your situation. It's about attaining what you seek, in my case the money and the power so I can allocate it as I please, that cannot be attained without tact and currently those who set the standard are Whites. Don't play yourself and pretend that you act exactly the same around an all black crowd as you do in a white crowd, we has Black people tend to have dual personas, it doesn't mean that we are fake or not true to our selfs it means that we know how to play the game.

        2. @Kriola,

          Of course, if you want something in an environment, you have to adapt to that environment. So how big does one draw the box?

          <blockquote cite="comment-313367">

          Kriola: Don’t play yourself and pretend that you act exactly the same around an all black crowd as you do in a white crowd

          I'll have to disagree with the default notion of "dual personas" in reference to environments dominated by different races. I display the same persona around strangers regardless of their skin color. The implied need for an extra race specific persona implies that certain behavior is innate to a skin color. Your statement is perfect if we were talking "dual personas" when comparing an environment of friends verses an environment of strangers. But why would I act differently with black strangers than white strangers? Wouldn't anybody act "with tact" in the presence of strangers regardless of color? Like really… What in the world would I be doing in the first place to feel like I need to hide from people of a certain color? That makes NO sense… There has to be some additional information to include other than the difference in skin color b/c I ask the same in a store with white strangers verses a store with black strangers. Believe it or not, the environment is the same…

          Maybe your idea requires additional information about the environment for there to be a totally different persona active. I will NOT act the same in an environment with white corporate execs as I do with black people in research. But that's not b/c of skin color, that's b/c of the culture. So a room full of black execs will get the same treatment as the white execs. And what is the culture? Clothes? Verbiage? I speak standard English around everyone, though I'll mix in slang at random times (more so around friends). There's no distinction b/t "black" professional and "white" professional. There's just professional. Maybe I'm confused on what you mean, but that blanket statement from above isn't reality for me. It;s just an excuse for people to perpetuate the idea of treating whites and blacks differently.

    2. "Like what are these interaction skills you learn from whites that require four years to learn? "

      For me it wasnt just whites. I went to a pretty mixed school so I interacted with many different cultures. For me being immersed in this type of atmosphere was priceless.

      I think it is especially beneficial for someone like me that spent most of my life in

      'segregated' schools.

      I think you should pick a school based off the experience YOU want to have. If you want the HBCU experience… go for it! Want to be around others… do that!

  62. I saw this post when it hit in my reader last night and I just laughed. Coming back to it now, it's gone exactly as I expected, having devolved into an HBCU vs PWI battle royale.

    HBCU graduates, you don't have justify shit to anyone. All that matters is the work that you do and what's deposited in your bank account on the 1st and 15th of every month.

    The end.

    signed a proud graduate of Prairie View A&M University, Class of 1995

  63. Being from Ohio, I just want to say shout out to Slim for putting 8 Ohio schools in the montage with THE Ohio State University being the biggest emblem dead set in the middle. Kudos to knowing what state is "bawse" when it comes to number of quality institutions! lol.

  64. I honestly didn't expect this to getthis much traction. Anywho, I think the bottom line point is parents wanting the best for their kids. The college/university choice is a personal one. My cousin has wanted to go to FAMU since forever. Their were countless schools interested in him…gew just finished his 2nd year in Tally. Plenty of better schools but that was his decision to make.

    I went to Tuskegee, would I want my kids to go there? Depends on the program, but that is with any school they are considering. I'm not one of those disillusioned alumni, my school isn't the shit in several aspects but it does provide a quality education and thats what really matters.

    I mean its not like they would be trying to join a different fraternity…some ish just doing fly in my house

  65. I actually agree!!! That's how I selected my grad school because my program is ranked #6 in the nation and despite what some may believe things like that as well as resources, alum donations, location, staff background, it all matters and makes a difference.

  66. The good thing about HBCU is that you don't come across ish like this
    "LSE academic's claim 'black women less attractive' triggers race row"

    That's the sort of ish you have to face in Europe.

  67. I graduated from UVA, Duke and am about to attend Johns Hopkins in a health related discipline. While I could have attended other schools, HBCUs included, I wanted the 'brands' that I have for global and local name recognition, opportunities for diversity, rich resources and the alumni networks. My father went to an HBCU in the 60s and encouraged us to pursue the most economical, highest ranked institution that we could attend. Why? Because, as a VP in a Fortune 100 company, he looked at where his bosses went and sent their children. Upon joining my second employer (a Fortune 50 company) the executive committee wanted to meet me because I was a Duke graduate. The President was from UNC/Harvard and the commercial VP was from Duke. My father is proof that an HBCU education can effectively prepare an individual for corporate America in the 70s, 80s and 90s. I assume its doing an effective job in this day and age–my company had only hired two graduates for their corporate office in the 10 years I was there. (There were black people from other institutions.)

    I haven't seen any comments about the influence of a global economy and competition may have on our children's career potential (though with 180 comments, I could have missed it). Having done some work in Europe, I never had to justify my education or experience because my colleagues recognized my institutions' names. By the time I have children, our society will be even more globalized, and therefore my children will likely have to build credibility will people in other parts of the world. Just something to think about….

  68. <blockquote cite="comment-313221">

    TheBourgeoisDubois: Like most things in the black community, HBCU’s are more about style and attitude than substance.

    I'm feeling this all day.

    There was Morehouse, I got a full academic ride. Most of the guys from my High school class applied to Morehouse. The ones that decided to go there, 70% of them failed out but 100% of them know how to dress. After receiving my award letter, they told me that every Thursday (or Wednesday) it was "dress up day." Sorry, but while growing up walking distance from the Morehouse, I couldn't afford suits. Told me those who don't comply will get put on social probation. the f*ck?!?! But wait, when I asked them the operational hours of the on-campus computer lab, they said it closes at 8pm on weeknights. I believe it was called Fredrick Douglas Hall and it had like 5 computers. That was in 2003 and I don't know what they have now.

    There was Princeton, but I don't like cold weather.

    There was Dartmouth, but I didn't want to play football anymore. Eff a sports scholarship and give me FULL academic scholarship.

    I went to University of the South (Sewanee). A PWI in the middle of nowhere, TN on top of a mountain and there was MAYBE 100 of "us." You know what though, that place supported my hustle. I could do everything I wanted MY way (as long as I didn't break anything). And the professor-student relationships were awesome: small classes with big things going on in them.

    For me, it's never been about HBCU verses PWI. That's an elementary argument and as college grads, we know it's about how a school fits into the cultivation of a child. Hopefully, that child has some input on that during this time in their lives. I didn't go to school to "have fun." I'm a fun guy so the "fun" will always be there. It's about the opportunities I can make with the tools from the school. I hate that the best argument people can give about a school is the social activities or the famous people whos children attend the school. Eff that…

    My children will go to where ever they want to go, just as long as they're out of the house and happy.

    1. Yo you went to school around my area! My pops fam is from Winchester and I went to high school in Chatt. You right about it not being many of 'us' around that area. I never knew they got any black folks from other areas in there.

  69. Omg…. I think I just spotted my future wife. Now I just have to track her down.

    "Rep wherever you reppin…."

  70. Um…interesting discussion today, lol.

    My kids will get to pick the school of their choice. No one picked for me…I won't pick for them. College/University/School based on profession is the only must. I had to pay my own way through school…still paying. So, I have started saving for their future…the plan is to pay or assist them.

    I went to predominately white schools most of my life. So, I preferred an HBCU for college. I had my foot in the door of a good, stable job at 17…so the college of my choice needed to be convenient more than prestigious so I could keep working there thru college and beyond. I got into Morgan State and Towson University…went to Morgan State. I was a commuter student so I wasn't immersed in college life anyway. I've got to say that my African Diaspora class was the BEST class I took at college (and my sociology class, lol). Looking back, I have no complaints. I have a great career in Information Technology and I'm making GREAT money to just have a bachelors (no more school for me). So, um, yeah. I'm financially stable and happy. Morgan State did what I needed it to do. No complaints. 😉

    1. I cosign all of this.

      I didn't care too much for the social dynamic since, for the most part, I was too busy to be a part of it. I choose my school based on the math/physics/cs professors, computer labs and IT department (computer & networking services).

      1. I worked in the mornings and went to school from about 1pm till 9pm some nights. I had no clue about the 'fun' at Morgan State. Plus, I was married at 19 so…whatever for college life. I had a home to run.

        I personally believe that college, and the opportunities that come from it, are what YOU make it. It's much more than a rank or a name. I'm sure it helps in some arenas…but it isn't everything. It's different for everyone.

        1. It isn't everything, but it can make things so much easier. You give more respect to a Lawyer/Doctor/Engineer/Scientist when they say they have their degree from a top school rather than some college you never heard of. And that respect can take them far. But you're right also….individual effort counts for a lot.

  71. Funny thing is, my friends and I were talking about this issue the other day. The whole school name really mattering in life. And I honestly think you're an idiot if you think the name of the school you went to means nothing at all. Yes, fun college experience matters, but college is about the opportunity afterward. And I am with you. My kids will only be going to a top ranked university. HBCU are cool, but that doesn't mean they are the best choice.

  72. Not much to add, but would like to rep for my fellow HBCU grads! If not for my HBCU education, I would not be going to one of the top 10 med schools in the country, and headed to Harvard for another degree in this fall! My friends and I were set for grad schools, many of us are at some of the best institutions in the country for our respective grad degrees, Berkeley, MIT, Columbia, Harvard, etc.

    Going to an HBCU was the best decision I made. Go HBCUs!!!!

  73. I'm not against HBCUs even though I did briefly go to one (Howard), but I wouldn't advise them to anyone who wants to do ANYTHING in the arts. If you're trying to be an English, Music, Film, etc. major they're not going to fund ANY money to your department.

  74. Funny thing about this debate is that many HBCUs won't be around in 25 years, so we know that we won't be debating this for the rest of eternity, relationships are here to stay though.

    It's true and many of us know it. This is truly not a shot at anyone, but they don't have the money and can't justify tuition increases. The government needs to give them funding and Congress will not allow it because they're being so poorly run. The states gov'ts who are funding them now are changing them into regular institutions and changing the demographics right away. Keeping the good programs and then stopping those programs at white schools and making people go to the former HBCU. Their endowments are not large enough to sustain this weakness for long enough. It's a fact, you can ask around even schools like Morehouse, Howard, Spelman and Hampton will not be able to survive it with their current endowments. In terms of fundraising, I believe I read somewhere that Spelman actually get the most alumni donations, but it is still a widespread problem that Black people don't give back to their HBCUs, heck I do my due diligence for the United Negro College Fund and I didn't benefit from it. The point is, they're going to need help in ways that just aren't feasible.

    Obama spoke on this already too. In order to fix the schools much of the administration and staff has to be completely turned over and you just can't justify putting all those people out of work. How will they get another job? So in reality, HBCUs are treated almost like ghettos. We know that they need help, but we can't actually do anything about it without displacing a lot of people. We look at them and we hope for the best because even the ghetto turns out some successful people.

    The key will be to determine if all of these products of HBCUs will return and assist in the revitalization or will they continue to leave and go to Ivy League schools for graduate and doctoral studies. The key will be to determine if you will be able to attract the top Black scholars and fundraisers to the HBCUs to save them. Knowing that research money would come in droves if you assembled better teachers and more money would flow into your endowment with better Chancellors and University Presidents. You see we're here debating the need for HBCUs amongst Black folk, we are already divided on the topic. I don't know if we'll have the support and drive needed to save these institutions from extinction.

    And after that somber comment, i'm going home.

  75. I am an upper classmen high school English teacher and I see my students making HORRIBLE decisions about college all of the time. Often times they are the first in their family to go so they do not know that much about school. I also solely believe in my heart of hearts that shows like A Different World, Teen Summit, etc. gave great exposure to college life and expectations. LOL at the Slimsha name. I think picking a school is tough and many factors matter 1) being money and 2) being intended major. With the cost of school today my Tiffany the 2nd and Timmy better figure it out the right way. The kids have no idea. I asked 3 of my classes the other day how many credits they needed to graduate and I heard answers like 45, 72, 1000. All over the place. For all of the graduates and alumni of all of the great institutions of higher education on this blog and others we all need to mentor the little lost babies.

  76. Disclaimer: Proud Spelman College Graduate, Proud University of Notre Dame Law School Graduate

    First, I think most of you missed the mark with this post and the comments about the post. I could have been angry with all the people hating on HBCUs (especially my alma matter) and disappointed with all my fellow HBCU alumni who decided to hate on people who attend non HBCUs (too many different acronyms to keep typing, PWIs/Ivy Leagues, etc..)

    Everyone (these days) has a choice. Everything is not for everyone. College is a choice just like many things in life and people (hopefully) choose what is best for them. There are many considerations to choosing a school. Black people in all fields have gone to different kinds of schools: HBCUs, Ivy Leagues, PWIs, etc….and some have gone to several different schools like myself. I really don't care what school YOU go to….just don't knock MY choices. Just like everything else in life, gneralizations only give you part of the story. Not all non-HBCUS are great and the same goes for ALL HBCUS. There are good ones and bad ones.

    My choices worked for me, and I will always rep both of my alma matters. I think it is hard for you to tell someone else what will work for them. In the words of young people, DO YOU! Also, do not knock someone else for doing what works for them. Just because I went to an HBCU does not make more Black than anyone else. By the same token, it does not mean I'm ill prepared for the world as we know it.

    Getting to the actual questions posted in the blog: I am going to encourage my children to attend my alma matters because I know the kind of education they will receive and for a host of other reasons (My daughter may not have a choice, LOL). At the end of the day, my money is going where I decide. If my child wants to go somewhere else I am not willing to pay for, they have to be prepared to pay for it themselves. I am not sure if this would be a deal breaker with a significant other, it is hard to say. I hope not.

    1. Very well said. I agree with all of this. I actually knew someone who went to Spelman undergrad and then to Notre Dame for law school. She used to live in Ohio before she moved away down south. Go figure. *shrugs*. Didn't realize that Spelman to ND route was that popular,lol. Small world.

  77. School is what you make it period. I went to a small HBCU and got right into a professional school. I went to undegrad for free and I sit right along in class with folks who went to Duke and Baylor. So the moral of the story is go to college and network. Hustle and grind for contacts and scholarships. One thing I will point out about HBCUs, alumni do help out the students. So we might not have the same funds, but in the end it's all about who you know and how you use it. I'm proud of my education and I don't care enough to knock someone else's. Get in where you fit in.

  78. I will actively encourage my child(ren) to attend NC A&T ESPECIALLY if they want to major in Engineering or any other STEM major. However, I will support my child no matter what school they decide to attend.

    My mom and my family supported me in my decision to leave L.A. for NC although they would have loved it if I either attended Tx. Southern like many members of my family did or a school close to home like USC, Fresno State, San Jose State or Cal Poly.

    My GF, and I would love for our child(ren) to attend A&T. We met there, it's one heck of an engineering school and has a great Journalism dept, and they produce people that achieve great goals in everything they put their minds to.

    But either way, our kid(s) will have the mindset to excel in college no matter where they are, PWI or HBCU; Ivy, PL, Big Ten or the local State College.

  79. Hi SBM!

    So I've been lurking for several months. And while I almost commented on many past blogs, this one touched a nerve. I'm so tired of people saying white schools are the only good ones. I went to an HBCU, Hampton to be exact. And I got a great education in chemical engineering there. I later decided to go to a big white school, Purdue, for my MBA.

    Im so glad my parents pushed me to get the black college experience! It was great to be in a place where for once, I wasn't the minority. My father went to black colleges all the way thru his PhD and has been quite successful. My degree from Hampton also never kept me from getting hired by a many major Fortune 100 companies. I was valedictorian of my high school class. Smart kids will likely do well wherever they go. But im convinced that the smaller, familial environment of an HBCU will nurture your childs development more than a big white school where he or she is just a number. And then when your child goes to grad school (cuz who doesn't these days?), they can get that top 25 school on their resume.

    1. Slim,

      I agree with you on this one. There is nothing wrong with HBCU's and I know some bright people who have graduated from Morehouse, Spelman, Howard, etc and been wildly successful. If you are very smart and motivated, you will usually find a way to the top.

      However, despite the "everybody loves and supports you because you're all black together" mentality, people forget that top 25 schools usually have exponentially more resources available for students. This includes fascilities, notable professors, technology, job resources, and alumni. I work in finance and you would be suprised how many people (recruiters included) who have no idea what a Morehouse is. In an increasingly competitive job landscape, I would rather my child have the name brand recognition that gives them the benefit of the doubt.

      Here's how I think about it. If my son/daughter is brilliant and motivated, why not go ot an ivy league school? If they are smart but not really concerned with GPA or class ranking, head to UNC or UVA. I think the small, mothering environment for HBCU's work for kids who would otherwise struggle in a big academic environment or need time connecting to black people.

      For better or worse, its still a white man's word and they will pick Harvard over Hampton, Michigan over Morehouse and Duke over Dillard almost every time.

      -Duke Blue

  80. My wife and I, as well as my grandmother and my mother-in-law all graduated from FAMU. We all received quality educations and can hang if not surpass any other degreed individual in our respective fields. Let me state clearly, we received qualitative educations from FAMU. I however will PAY for my children to go to another university before I allow them to set foot on FAMU's campus even if they had a full ride.

    I don't believe for a second that "white makes right." I do however believe that the resources, facilities and (something that we don't like to talk about) business practices of most HBCUs trails top 100 universities. My own experiences at FAMU (when it was among the top 100 schools) and how they conduct business make me sick to my stomach. I know folks that won't accept mediocre service from McDonald's but they'll proudly pay thousands of dollars per year for their children to attend FAMU to receive the same mediocre service (NOT education) all in the name of tradition.

    I can't in good consciousness allow my daughter or my son to walk into that type of culture. My kids will face the same struggles, ups and downs that have linked every person that has ever experienced college. I'll do my part to minimize the BS they'll go through by "encouraging" them to attend an institution that values them and their contributions instead of treating them like another play-cousin/mama nem/dime-a-dozen black person.

  81. My immigrant father who came from nothing and made a doctor of himself through his own struggles always says the following: "I didn't go to Harvard or Howard but at work, Harvard and Howard alums report to me. Why? bc I read those books better than they did." Education is what you make of it. I went to an ivy for undergrad and I am at Howard for law school. The only demand I will make on my children is to keep an open mind, avoid this arrogant elitist mentality, and most of all, to stay hungry for knowledge.

  82. I'm late and I'm sure it no longer matters, but I read all the comments and thought about it. I guess my question is who determines what is the best? Just because US News & World Report says it's the "best" doesn't mean it's the best for me and minez. I am a proud Spelman grad and would love for my daughter to go to Spelman. But it might not be a good fit for her. She might not flourish there. Especially if she is born a he.Heh. But that doesn't mean one of the top 50 girls is the right fit either. Maybe my child will want to go to a small school that few people recognize. Maybe they'll want to travel a year before even thinking about college. Maybe they'll want to go to trade school. Maybe they will go to college, but like my co-worker's daughter has done – upon graduation will plan to only work for 'the man' for a year so she can stack her dough and then open a hair salon because ever since she was a little girl she's always wanted to cut hair and do nails. As I get older, I realize that I was the happiest when I made the best decisions for me and me alone – this meant having to ignore criticism and curious stares as I went on to live my best life. I only hope that I could raise my children to have that same courage and create a path that works best for them.

  83. To each is it's own, but I personally feel that HBCU schools are not where it's at because of the simple fact that it is NOT a real college experience. From experience attending Spelman College for my freshman year, that year I grown to realize that that environment was not the appropriate environment for me to flourish. However, my cousin went to Spelman, graduated and is now on to medical school, but we are two different individuals. It worked for her and not for me. Now I am attending a state university in New York and find the experience to be much better and I am able to have an education and not a BLACK education. I have all the courses that are taught at Spelman and other black schools and much more, especially in the African history and culture aspect. Just because you have attended a HBCU does not mean you should inflict that on your children. They should have that option of where they want to pursue their academic career.

    P.S. What is "nice hair"?

  84. <blockquote cite="comment-313607">

    CAnthony: To each is it’s own, but I personally feel that HBCU schools are not where it’s at because of the simple fact that it is NOT a real college experience. From experience attending Spelman College for my freshman year, that year I grown to realize that that environment was not the appropriate environment for me to flourish. However, my cousin went to Spelman, graduated and is now on to medical school, but we are two different individuals. It worked for her and not for me. Now I am attending a state university in New York and find the experience to be much better and I am able to have an education and not a BLACK education. I have all the courses that are taught at Spelman and other black schools and much more, especially in the African history and culture aspect. Just because you have attended a HBCU does not mean you should inflict that on your children. They should have that option of where they want to pursue their academic career.P.S. What is “nice hair”?

    The good hair comment totally threw/turned me off. Since when does having good hair make you more likely to get a scholarship? We could have done without that.. .http://thirtythoughts.wordpress.com/2011/05/27/dark-girls/

  85. I don't understand this whole obsession with college! We are living in a day and age where a college education is equal to an advanced high school degree. The majority of the Western world desires, plans, and attends colleges and universities, and attain some kind of undergraduate degree. Because it is so common, it has lost its value…somewhat.

    Like you said, Slim, college is supposed to be the best 4 years of your life. College is WAY more than a place to earn a degree. It's an institution of growth, an opportunity to foster relationships, a test of perseverence, and a place for creating lifelong colleagues! When put it this way, the decision about which college to attend should consider how all those aspects can be fulfilled…even the climate you prefer is important when considering choice of school.

    That being said, most of us will go on to attain advanced degrees for our career of choice. It is in THOSE institutions that you will make necessary connections, get the necessary achievements to land you the job you desire.

    I attended an HBCU, but not one the popular and larger ones. My HBCU is probably not known in the non-Adventist circles, since it is a Seventh-Day Adventist University in Alabama. I've attended public schools all my life (except for 1st and 2nd grade), and this would be the first private Christian institution I would have attended. And being that it is the only SDA HBCU in the country, it attracted the mecca of talented (musically and otherwise), intelligent, attractive Black men and women from all over the world! How fortunate was I? I was living in a dream world for 4 years…never again have I been fortunate to swim in such awesomeness! Boy, I miss college.

    The argument I hear again and again about HBCU is that it is not the real world! My counter argument is that I get to live in the real world for the next 50+ years, and prior to my college experience, I've experienced the real world in full magnitude…and after my college experience, I'm continually experiencing the "real" world, quite literally, since I've lived around the world since 2007. And yet, when I look back at my amazing college experience, I will always have fond memories and will never regret "not living in the real world" for those 4 short years.

    The greatest benefit of having attended my HBCU is that we were quite truly a family. Anywhere in the world I've gone, when I meet someone from my HBCU, no matter what their grad date, they automatically take care of me, and vice versa!

    And for those who doubt the quality of education I've received, here are my stats:

    graduated with Honors with a B.S in Biology at 21, graduated in the top 10% of my class with a M.S in Biomedical Science at 23, (took two years off to explore the world of Asia), will graduate in 2013 with an M.D, and is currently an Honors student (top 10% of my class), and I'm 27, no kids out of wedlock, no divorces, good credit…only the world of medicine, world travel, and family to look forward to.

    An institution can only give you the tools and it's up to you to make what you will of it!

  86. You do realize that when they are saying that, in parentheses they are saying (for an all black school). You go to an HBCU for the experience. Please do not kid yourself into thinking that its for the superior education, because it is not.

    <blockquote cite="comment-313495">

    Jane doh:

    Soooo not true…I can only speak for Spelman and Morehouse…but whenever i mention that I went to Spelman I get alot of respect from people, particularly white people.I attend a top 20 law school right now…sat with one of my deans at this event, ended up telling her i went to spelman…FIRST WORDS out of her mouth….Spelman…excellent school, class women…I get the same response whenever I meet with my professors in office hours…

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