Home Featured Red Tails: Expecting the Worst or Supporting the Best?

Red Tails: Expecting the Worst or Supporting the Best?

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**Commercial for Red Tails airs for the 34th time**

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTtlW9gxQoc

Her: Oh! Red Tails comes out this weekend. Let’s go see it!
Me: You think that movie looks good? That preview was kinda lame sauce…
Her: It’s not about the preview. It’s about supporting the movie. We don’t get many opportunities.
Me: It didn’t really move me though. I’ll wait for Rotten Tomatoes.
Her: Support black actors and black movies before they go extinct! Did you not see what Tyler Perry said about the state of black films?
Me: **Finishes game of Snood and looks slowly to the right** I’d rather see DuckTales. Ou-woo.
Her: Grrrr. You’re soooo Republican.
Me: You’re soooo pushing it and I don’t mean that in no nice way.

Today marks the opening of Red Tails, a much acclaimed and supported movie that brings an adapted part of (African) American history to the silver screen. And with the forty something previews I’ve seen for the flick, I haven’t been moved once to purchase a ticket. I’ve tried to stir the motivation within and it’s been to no avail. But before someone goes on Youtube and says Slim Jackson doesn’t care about black people, let me elaborate in Barackian style.

I found myself thinking about the way we approach black goods and services in general. Much like the big bosses in the white-run Hollywood studios, we have a habit of leading with skepticism and finishing with surprise when it comes to stuff for us by us and coincidentally viewed by them. Aside from music, sports, hair, and a few other categories, we hear the word “black” as a descriptor for an event, product, or service and cast a cautious side-eye. Put more simply, we expect the worst and hope for the best. It’s like an inferiority complex that we remove ourselves from in the moment before carrying on with our regular lives.

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I mention this because after I defended my right to not see the movie, I wondered if I’d been subconsciously programmed to expect less from people that look like me? Did seeing Terrence Howard and Cuba Gooding Jr. in the trailer blackwash the purity of my desire to support?

 

You'll be okay, shugah. You'll be okay. Have a cookie.

After several reassuring words to myself, I took my concerns, let go, and let the Oracle from The Matrix have her way. It turned out that my apathy for the movie had nothing to do with my expectations of BET black productions, and everything to do with my affinity for quality (Subjective, I know). This isn’t to say I expect the movie to tailspin. It just means the trailer didn’t convert my curiosity to Fandango dollars, which means I’m not excited to see it. First impressions are everything.

The thing is, I don’t walk around expecting black goods, services and productions to suck. That was decided long before I came to Alvin Ailey’s Revelation. It’s just that I like good products and services period. I support what appeals to me. And if it happens to be black-owned or black-produced, that’s like mocha icing on the cake.

When it comes to a production like Red Tails, I don’t want it to be us blindly promoting an artist from a friend’s label. I don’t want us to resort to buying all of the artist’s CDs just so we can see his or her name on the chart. Yes, that looks good and allows us to say “we did it!” But at the end of the day, it’s the same product. It’s also what many of us did when we elected the POTUS, though I think that was a good decision. Anyway…

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Let’s make sure we’re supporting it because we expect it to be good and not just because it’s black and needs our support.

I understand that we’re trying to pave a road, but we need to remember that it’s coated with more than melanin. It’s coated with high expectations, potential, and hard work. Whatever the case, I hope this movie does well. The price is high and I’d hate to see our collective Hollywood stock drop.

Will you be checking out Red Tails this weekend?

Is it more important that we have a movie with an all black cast or that we have good black actors and actresses in good movies? (Both is the obvious answer, so I’m taking that one off the table.)

Do you believe in supporting good black productions or all black productions regardless of what you know about them? How does this translate into the way you make other decisions?

And as usual, all other thoughts are welcome!

Ou-woo,

Comment(115)

  1. I am with you on this. I support quality regardless of whether it's black owned or black produced. To be told that I am not doing my part because I won't support my people is a concept I can't get with. Its like hiring a person based on race rather than what qualities and/or significant contributions they can make in said position. It's an insult to be quite honest.

  2. Haha @ Ou-woo.

    My eyebrow was somewhat raised as I watched the preview, because the last word I'd read before that was "best," and I was definitely not impressed by the brief acting scenes shown. I had no foreknowledge of the film beyond its name that I've seen come up on Twitter once or twice, and had no idea it was a "black movie". I reacted to it the same way I would've reacted if the cast were all-white.

    Solidarity is nice and all, but I favour supporting excellence rather than mediocrity for the sake of representation. I'm speaking in general terms, as I'm currently not well equipped to criticize this particular work. To answer your questions:

    1) I will not be seeing the movie this weekend
    2) Good black actors/actresses in good movies
    3) I believe in a meritocratic basis of success, so I'm more interested in supporting good black productions. Or at the very least, ones that interest me. Not everything I like is of excellent quality. In terms of general decision-making, I do not blindly support any one endeavour, regardless of my affiliation with it.

    1. A meritocratic basis of success ignores social factors to becoming successful/unsuccessful….its an interesting stance for an underrepresented minority to have. I know we are just talking about movies but I'm just sayin…..

      1. In the context of everything I've said, it's being used to signify recognizing a movie based on its merits, rather than its cast.

        1. hmmm I guess, but 4.5 years at a liberal school in an even more liberal sociology department has conditioned me to give a side eye when that phrase is used. I mean even in movies, what has really influenced our definition of "good" Black productions? Do they all have to have some deep underlying message or can it just be a good action flick that tells a Black story? Maybe it doesn't seem like it will be a good movie because we haven't really seen Black action movies before and we don't know what its supposed to look like…..I think if you compare it to Transformers, one of the highest grossing action films (ok I made that stat up) maybe it will look better….

        2. I guess I will speak for myself. A "good" black production is a good production that has been labelled "black" for whatever reason. As I pointed out, my opinion on this particular movie was not coloured by race. I don't generally hold so-called black movies to a higher or lower standard than other ones. It simply looks like something I would watch if there were nothing on, or if someone I knew wanted to watch it. On average, my standards are pretty relaxed.

  3. I'm always in support of quality Black productions. Unfortunately, in the Black community "hustle" is more important than quality 9 times out of 10. And the few times quality does emerge to the general populace the creator(s) burn themselves out and run away from the public. Nevertheless, I still try to get the word out there and personally support lesser known Black productions/stories in anyway I can.
    http://focusfeatures.com/pariah/theatres

    Go see Pariah instead. Or in addition to if you're really looking forward to Red Tails and can spare funds for both.

  4. I'm going to see the movie not because I blindly support all black things (because you will not catch me in the theater for Tyler Perry movies) but because I support mainstream coverage of Black American stories that don't perpetuate hurtful and demeaning stereotypes and movies that depict Black males and females in a positive light. Too often all we see of Black people (mostly men) in movies are deadbeats who are ghetto and lazy or radical and crazy (ahem, Tyler Perry) so anything that can give positive examples I support (which is why I don't support Tyler among other reasons).
    So while it may not be the best movie ever it does tell the story of the Tuskegee Airmen who are a huge source of pride for the Black community. I am hoping that by supporting this film it will encourage others to make ones like it, Hollywood to support others like it and show the youth and other races/cultures that we have more than just rappers and athletes to look up to.
    ….And it doesn't hurt that Nate Parker and Micheal B. Jordan are in the movie.

    1. I agree with you entirely!! I won't be seeing it this weekend, but already have plans to see it next weekend. We need movies like this. Movies where African Americans are portrayed in a good light instead of the same stereotypes being shown over and over and over. Tyler Perry will never get some of my money for obvious reasons. I will and have been making sure that I spread the word about this movie. As a community, we cannot complain about things we don't have, yet when it pops up….we say it sucks before watching and then go back to complaining the next day. Plus….the generations growing up need to know this story!

    2. The movie was awesome ..one of the best I’ve seen in a while..I hate how people say they are not going to see it because it doesn’t showcase this or because its a “black” film..Ect…no true story ever showcases every single detail..why pick this one apart? I loved this movie and it was very motivational..I want to make sure my son sees it.. think not abt what they have not shown, and give credit for them putting it out there because some people are so ignorant, that the only way.they will learn about their culture is to watch it instead of read it.

  5. i personally became skeptical of "supporting" red tail just bc i feel like i'm being forced/ordered to go see it. I saw preview few months back and my thoughts were "looks decent, but they already made movie about tuskegee airmen(1995 hbo movie) back in day" and though nothing of it.

    then last week all the george lucas guilt trip/sob stories started popping up of how he backed the movie and put up money. while i respected that, i still interpreted his story/interview as "look blk ppl i put up $60mil of my own money for yall, so yall BETTER go see it OR ELSE!!" i'll admit i may be wrong, but fifty-eleven blk folks preaching "we HAVE to support it" didn't help. just think the "we gotta support or they won't make any more positive blk film" scare tactics is too much and a turn off t me. Ppl are really acting like this is 1952 (and not 2012) and hollywood is really betting the future of EVERY blk film on success of "red tails". I just naturally skeptical whenever i feel like i'm being told i have to do something, especial when i feel like its just going be in order to make sure a white man get his money/investment covered(yea i'm slightly pro-black lol)

    A better tactic would have been to get white(and other) ppl to go out and see it!! black ppl are going regardless, but to make it smash box office hit and success, white ppl need to see it as well. WE only make up 12-14% of america, so even if every blk person in america goes to see "red tail" it will be moderate success. probably 60-75% of ppl that will see it, will see it this weekend, so even if its #1 movie and clears $30mil this weekend, it will have SHARP decline proceeding weeks, thats were white/other ppl could/should pick up slack. I think blks have enough ppl to make it a opening weekend success, but to make it box office success there needs to be more help. i hope i'm wrong but i think it will have big opening weekend then fade away afterwards, simply bc it was marketed as "black movie" rather than "action movie w/black stars"

    I think this is going be more so a action movie based on historical facts, rather than a historical film with action scenes, i think a lot of blks are hyping it bc they think its historical film. I suspect the racial tone/issues wil be watered down or breezed over and there will be lots of action/special effects. once again i could and hope i am wrong

    none the less i will go see it just to see what fuss is about. but having seeing hbo version and read about them, my expectation are low.

    1. I am going to actually agree with you on the george lucas comments (who are we really making this money for??) and the pressure black ppl put on you to go see it and the numbers thing. Sometimes I think we forget we are a minority which means even if we all see a movie its only a small percentage of the total number of movie goers. While I will be making a full comment further down and yes I will be going to see it b/c as a descendent I do feel a certain obligation I wanted to do a short co-sign to some of what you said.

    2. See this is the reason I was giving it the side eye. Lucas. Rubs me the wrong way.. rich white man doing a historical “black” film. Racism will seep out. Too many holes for it not to. Look at The Help. Yeah. Nuff said.

      Ima keep saying, tho. I know. I KNOW they are going to have a whit hero saving those poor not quite adequate negroes. They HAVE to sneak in the white hero. If there is one white person in the film, he will be the hero, somehow. If Lucas managed to make a black film with no white hero, then hes cast himself as the hero. When what he’s really doing is trying to get a little Tyler Perry cash. Yeah, we can make a film producer rich without a white audience. Who knew? Lucas wants somodat action.

  6. This is a tricky one. On one side I understand the whole supporting African Americans in a positive light in media argument but on the other hand I’m not sitting in anticipation waiting for Red Tails to come out. I might go see it but the preview didn’t make me excited about the movie. I think this is just a case of last minute PR and not so good advertisement. Now one preview that really caught my attention was for the movie Pariah ( its has an all black cast and the plot seems really good)

  7. I don't support everyyyyyyone or thing that's black. But I fundamentally disagree with you–I definitely support certain things because its black-owned or has some positive effect for black people. As long as I can believe in it, I'm always down to promote ish black people are doing, I don't care lol. Then again, I also lightweight support re-segregation.

    I feel weird about this movie because it IS directed (produced?) by a white dude, and therefore is told, somewhat, through the lens of a white man which is problematic. However, I'm over it and have ultimately decided in FAVOR because I'm interested in the story, it's a facet of black history I'm not familiar with, and it seems like a quality action movie with black people in leading roles, which is exciting to me.
    My recent post CNN Debate: Have WASPs forsaken Jesus for the GOP?

      1. The main credited writer is John Ridley who has a lengthy screenplay resume. George Lucas would'nt hire the writer of an animation series for a major film. The director is Anthony Hemingway. You are correct that they are Black men.

  8. I live in LA. The only color that matters in "Hollywood" is green, $$$ all day long. George Lucas, a white producer funded most of the project with the help of Oprah and Tyler Perry contributing $35 million. The statement that is potentially being made if the film with an all Black cast doesn't do well (regardless of the perception of the film in totality based on the trailer) is that Black people don't want to spend money on intelligent stories told by a Black cast. It is assumed that Black people will gladly spend their money to see Black actors (mainly men) dress up like somebody's grandma, or tell pimp and gangsta stories. With all of the success of Spike Lee, Denzel, Sydney Potier and countless others this is still what the "Hollywood Powers That Be" dictate based on sales $$$. Sure, you can argure that it doesn't look like a quality project. But the real question is- if you saw a better quality trailer with Cat Williams holding a joint and cracking a joke would it be more appealing? Just sayin'. This is what "Hollywood" execs believe based on the green$.

    1. Camille, I see what your saying, but I think that's the second point. The main point is from a business standpoint the movie only appeals to one group of people. They've done a lot to make the movie appeal to everyone, but let's be honest. It's a movie that only Black people and a few cool white people desirous of making people think they're down will go see. Therein lies the problem. Black people make up a small percentage of the people in America. When you make this movie, it's can't even compete with a movie like Spielberg's movie about a damn horse. Or Contraband. Because let's keep it real, it's Black people who will go see Contraband, but some of those same white people Italians and folks from Boston won't go see Red Tails to save a kitten.

  9. I haven’t even finished the post yet. I just got hung up on the fact that u play snood. Lol. I love that ish!

    *continues reading*

  10. I saw the trailer and thought, "I'd like to see that" I didn't get the same thoughts of mediocrity as some of you. *shoulder shrug*

  11. I understand the need for us to act as one another's crutch, but I won't support any movie, regardless of the cast's complexion, if it doesn't look like it'll be good. And to be honest, the skepticism that you spoke of is warranted. With the exception of films created by Spike, Townshend and Singleton, most black movies are garbage. This isn't for lack of talent by the actors; it's just that the stories are usually trite and banal.

  12. The thing that really gets me is that most people would go see these SAME BLACK ACTORS in some busted up, degrading, stereotyped BLACK PRODUCED movie. These same actors would get so much love for being on screen doing the nothingness that is most of OUR shows! This movie isn't even PRODUCED by a black person…it's produced by George Lucas, the man who did Star Wars (or whatever that geeky mess is) and he didn't do the show because it would generate "black support". He just did it because he felt it was a PART OF HISTORY (not even BLACK history) that needed to be told. And what's even more is he put his own money into the thing.
    Go see, don't go see it…but to place you "reason" for not on the quality of the movie, when ALL those BLACK MEN actors have gotten rave reviews in stupid crap is just mean. You haven't even seen the movie yet and already you're judging performance by a 20-second clip, or whatever. I think that's just sad….

    1. "You haven't even seen the movie yet and already you're judging performance by a 20-second clip, or whatever. I think that's just sad…. "

      But thats what the 20 second clip is meant to do, make you want to go see the film. Again I dont think people are saying the film is going to be trash, but the promotion for the movie is'nt driving people to go see it. I saw a preview for red tails in the moive thearter and that preview made me go "oo we shoudl go see this" the one they showed on TV not so much.

      As far as other black movies go, it looks like most support ppl like Tyler Perry, but we have to remember he already had a grasp on the BLK community with his plays so its was'nt as hard to draw them to go see the movie if they already have the play at home.

      Should we go support it based off the history of the movie alone yes, but if some dont want to see it that does'nt mean their selling out or not supportig their ppl. If this article was about ppl going to see Madea' s Christmas and ppl said they would not see it, it wouldnt be an issue.

  13. And this is why we can't have nice things.

    Sorry, but as a people we are incredibly good at making every effort to entertain us incredibly effing difficult and fraught with possibilities of being labeled racist and/or insensitive. It's amazing ANYTHING with black cast members gets shown at all.

    If the trailer didn't interest you, fine, but this is a case where (and I hate that I'm even writing this) I hope the white majority in this country saves us from our own hypersensitivity by purchasing tickets en masse. People are saying it felt like Lucas was saying "oh, I did this for black people now they owe me." Er, reaching out to black people via the Daily Show? Right…

    I for one will be seeing the film. Not simply because it casts black actors (I skip out on plenty of tyler perry movies despite this), but because it's giving shine to a group of *black* men who have either been forgotten or were never known by mainstream America. And from what I gather, the film sought to show them in a heroic light, second to no white characters and the typical "this is what I learned from seeing black people discriminated against" coming of age story. I also love action movies. I'd like to say I'm shocked, but really every time an "acceptable" black movie comes out, the black community does it's damnedest to torpedo it. It's disappointing.

  14. I'm going to see it tomorrow. I have my share of concerns because I'm a history/WWII nerd but I'm excited about Red Tails and then there's the actual chance that the movie is actually good. The fact that we have talented actors doing something other than comedy (Which is fine.), being gangsters, or magical negroes is important to me.

    -Is it more important that we have a movie with an all black cast or that we have good black actors and actresses in good movies? (Both is the obvious answer, so I’m taking that one off the table.)

    If I can have both slices of both of those cakes and still eat them then I'm all for it. If I can have Hotel Rwanda and then have Angela Bassett or Erica Tazel do their thing in a movie that isn't "typically black" I'm a f**king for it. But since I can't I'll take the latter.

    My recent post “Ours”, “Theirs”, Possessive Pronouns, Hate, and “You”

    1. -Do you believe in supporting good black productions or all black productions regardless of what you know about them? How does this translate into the way you make other decisions?

      I'll support the good ones or the ones that I actually like. Compare it to any black business. I'd be happy as hell to give you my dollars but the service and product has to match or surpass the money I spend.

      My concerns about the movie centered on the CGI but there are only so many Mustangs that can still fly so I get that and it's George Lucas so some CGI is going to be included. If this opens the door for films about Robert Smalls, Nat Turner, an updated film about the all Japanese 442nd RCT, or any other ethnic story based in history then it is a small victory.

      My recent post “Ours”, “Theirs”, Possessive Pronouns, Hate, and “You”

        1. Yeah….

          Even Obama with the help of the holy black trinity (Malcom, Martin and Jesus) couldn't make that happen.

        2. Same here Kema. That would be AWE.some. Here's the thing, I just took a genealogy workshop at the library and they spoke of at least 5 slave 'revolts'. I was like, I got to look this up.

  15. I was born & raised in Tuskegee, so I will be going to see if it is an accurate depiction of what I grew up learning. I am happy that that my children will get a chance to see something of this magnitude on the big screen. Those Brothers deserve to be honored in this way.

    I still go on the T U Campus when I go home and tour the Chappie James plane, see Booker T Washington's home and plan to take my children to tour the George Washington Carver Museum on the campus. These are the things I grew up learning about….not that we were only slaves, but that we are BRILLIANT. I plan to teach my children the same.

    We can't see where to go if we don't see where we came from. This movie will be educational if nothing else and that in itself is a reason for it to be sold out.

    ***I went to the BET Honors taping last weekend in DC, one of the Honorees are the Tuskegee Airmen, they seemed as if their community acknowledging them was like winning a billion dollars. It's sad that it took a non black man putting ALL his money into a movie for US to recognize.

    1. Your article is posted Beef. You submitted it 5 times. That's never going to help. I can't tell you why it was in moderation, but now I have to delete all the unnecessary comments too.

      All — When a comment goes into moderation, all of us get an email stating as such, trust me, we know. And while i'm sure everyone wants to be heard, it is a challenge to run the site. Keep us in mind, we are working diligently to fix the problem as fast as possible.

  16. Here's the thing about 'Red Tails' – it's not a "black movie;" it's a movie with some black folks in it. There's a difference. When I think "black movie" I think 'Pariah' or 'Night Catches Us' or any number of other films that not only have black people IN them, but were created, directed and produced by black people. George Lucas made this movie and he dates a black chick, but he is far from black. I've never been one to support a film, or anything else, just b/c there was black involvement if it didn't seem of interest to me. My dollars are hard-earned and I don't feel the need to spend them just to say I supported something that some black folks had some involvement in. From the onset, I side-eye any movie w/ Terrence Howard or Ne-Yo, let alone both of them. Not because they're black but because they're whack. I also don't like movies based on historical events- I'd much rather read a book or see a documentary on the subject. I hope that Red Tails turns out to be a decent film, but I doubt I'll be seeing it in the theater.
    My recent post adorn yourself FOR yourself!

  17. I agree with you on this. I get a lot of grief for not supporting “black movies” and actors and TV shows. They claim we won’t get more if we don’t support. My rebuttal is that if we keep supporting crap, they’ll think we like it and keep giving us crap. So we still lose. Everyone is talking about this because it’s part of our history. Yes we should know it, but I can read about it.

  18. I support quality, and Red Tails looked good to me. I was more pumped for this than the Mission Impossible and Sherlock Holmes sequels. I mean, I see Lucasarts + Tuskegee Airmen. The only way this could have been better is if it was Lucasarts + Tuskegee Airmen + alien invasion.

  19. A good flick is a good flick..blk white whatever, i don't think it matters. No I'm not rushing to the theater just because its an all blk cast. Its a higher chance I'll go see it if I hear good things about it

  20. Look, you don't have to do anything except pay taxes and die…. So no, you dont HAVE to see this movie Slim.
    But not seeing this movie, just to prove a point it kinda wack, Black stuff needs a support system or else it fails, you know that you have often called out other black males for not supporting each other in their efforts. If Smart people don't support smart things, the stupid shall inherit the earth.

    Now the question is, is this movie Smart and worthy of our support and the legacy of the Tuskegee airmen. I don't know much about this director, but he seemed to have paid his dues. And at the end of the day, George Lucas is George Lucas. And what he said on the Daily Show is true and we KNOW IT. I think we should praise white man willing to support the claims we make everyday, its unbiased 2520s that add validity to claims. If it was just black actors saying it, it becomes self serving. When Lucas says it.. its truth, he has no reason to lie. Why else would an all time great producer have to put his own money up?

    1. I was waiting for someone to mention something I've said about black men supporting each other in the past. A few things though.

      I never said I wouldn't see the movie. I said the preview didn't look interesting so I'd treat it just like I do anything else. First impressions are everything and I don't think they did as good a job as they could' have. Then I did some introspection about why I wasn't inclined to see the movie, which led me to think about how black folks approach stuff for us by us in general. There are a million ways to slice this discussion and all sorts of scenarios that could prove my line of thinking crooked, so I get that. But honestly, I just want us to be great. I don't want us to support things just because they're black. I want us to support because they're excellent or have the potential to be — which is why I don't think you can compare what I've said about black men supporting each other to whether or not everybody goes out to the theater.

      When people ask me for help, I offer it to them. When people ask me to promote something for them, I look at the body of work and if it's in line with what I represent and believe in, I share it. If not, I offer suggestions to help bring them to the next level. Blind support doesn't make us better. Neither does holding things produced by us to a lower standard to be deemed acceptable.
      My recent post Plain Truth: Why You Shouldn’t Put Bloggers on Pedestals

      1. "Neither does holding things produced by us to a lower standard to be deemed acceptable."

        You are preaching to the choir Pastor Slim. I'm dying to find the next black genius film maker. I'm just confused on how Basketball wives, Steve Harvey, Tyler Perry, Wacka Flocka, & BET as a staff, record label, and MF crew all get a pass when people play the 'support' card, but a story based off of WWII heroes gets called to the floor for not being up to standards?
        I feel like the audience is point fingers at the performers and saying "Do better" and the performers are pointing fingers right back saying "You Lazy!" Both sides need to step up.

    2. "If Smart people don't support smart things, the stupid shall inherit the earth. "
      Thank you for saying this. I completely agree.

  21. I'm a movie snob through and through, so much so that I sometimes pass silent judgment on folks based on what's on their list of favorite movies. "What's that you say, Scarface is better than the Godfather?" or "Menace is in the same class as Boyz in the Hood?" Oh… ok.

    I say all that to say, I'm not the type of person who supports stuff just because it's "black" or "black related" and I'm not the kind of person who would go see a movie just because it seems like I should.

    I am however going to see Red Tails, and I did make it a point to organize a group of friends to make the trek with me (SeeWhatIDidThere). But before we all go see it, I think we need to be clear on exactly what it is. It's a big budget hollywood action flick inspired by real events. We should be expecting "Independence Day" or maybe "Top Gun" not "Raging Bull" or "American Beauty". This isn't going to be high art, it's going to have cheesy action flick lines, it's going to have a character that we all love die heroically, there's going to be a love story intertwined somewhere – it's going to be exactly what a big budget action flick always is. And so despite my general snobbery, I do have a soft spot for these kinds of flicks, and I'm excited they finally made one about a bunch of people who look just like me. The fact that it's inspired by the actions of real life American Heroes whose story has yet to be told to this scale is icing on the cake.

    So, I totally feel where everyone is coming from on the George Lucas guilt tripping… last week around this time I tweeted "I was already planning to see Red Tails but if y'all keep running this guilt trip it's going to have the opposite effect." It is annoying. However, I think we have to set aside our annoyance and weigh what Lucas and others are saying by the merit of the words alone. I think what he's saying is accurate. This movie will be a bit of a test. It will show us whether or not it's possible for our supposedly post-racial society to accept a movie like this and if it fails, I doubt we'll see another one.

    So yeah, I'm going to see Red Tails, I hope it's awesome and I hope it does big numbers. If it sucks, you can expect a post up from me lampooning it and telling you all how upset with George Lucas I am for making me waste my time and money.

    NYC folks, a few of us are going to see it at the theater on 34th and 8th at 730. Feel free to roll through… as long as you're not a crazy psycho-killer person … if you are… I keeps the roscoe on me… nah mean. Maybe we'll all grab a drink on Slims dime somewhere after. #MoneyTeam (just kidding, slim ain't buying).

    1. Had come to come here and say that I wholeheartedly agree with being clear on what this movie will be. It IS a big budget action film. Michael Bay makes a living making movies with cheesy dialogue and a gratuitous amounts of explosions and action, but a lot of us (including myself) try to be so above all that that we expect this movie to be a deep exploration of the characters and the social and cultural difficulties that they faced during that time. While I'd love to see this movie be a lot more art than action, especially considering the story it's telling, I know not to expect that. Enjoy it for what it is, not what we hoped it would be.

    2. correct me if I'm wrong but is'nt this going to be like a remake of the first Tuskegee airman movie with Lawerence Fishburn. I figure they were remaking it with a heavier focus on action to get action movie junkies to go see it. The first one focused more on the trialsof being a black man in the airforce in those times. Not saying this one wont focus on it, but I think it will just have more fighting scences.

      1. Nah Smielz, this is a completely new script. The one with Fishburn was made by HBO. They operating off of completely new material, though both films are based on the same source material (the Tuskegee Airman).

        According to Lucas, if this one does well there's a sequel and a prequel already written. The prequel focuses on the training, and the sequel deals with the racism they experienced when they came home from the war.

    3. "I think we need to be clear on exactly what it is. It's a big budget hollywood action flick inspired by real events. We should be expecting "Independence Day" or maybe "Top Gun" not "Raging Bull" or "American Beauty"."

      ^ The type of movie I most enjoy 🙂 Give me a big-budget action flick any day/night and I'm happy to go see it. This one has been on my list since I saw a preview at the theater a month or so ago. I do not tend to blindly support anything just because of the cast. I'm actually seeing it DESPITE Cuba Gooding and Terrence Howard (both of whom I dislike as actors).

  22. In 2007, I had the opportunity to go to Hawaii and visit Pearl Harbor. I can't begin to describe the experience but I will say it was surreal. I actually stood on the platform built over the USS Arizona. While doing so, I called my great-uncle who had fought in the war. I listened to his stories and it touched something in me. I will be going to see this movie. How many movies can we say have been brainstormed by a white man about a black man's accomplishment. I am tired so maybe that is why I answer with none. If there are than, I stand corrected. I will support every last movie that puts these men in a positive light. Men who were commanded to fight and had it not been for their determination and opportunities would have been relegated to be the cook or mess boys like my great-uncles and cousins.

    I hear your sentiment and even understand but I also see the bigger picture.
    My recent post Terms Defined

    1. I've watched a ton of documentaries about WWII and blacks in WWII and one of the Tuskegee Airmen was reflecting about how he knew he was fighting for the right thing. He told a story of when he was shot down, captured, interrogated. The German who was asking the questions walked in with two books. The first was his college year book, which he opened and asked "Isn't this you?" The second was a picture of his flight school class from Tuskegee and he said "Isn't this you also?" Dude was like that when everything go real for him.

      I agree that these men who were well-educated btw deserve to have their story told again and again for the cheap seats.
      My recent post “Ours”, “Theirs”, Possessive Pronouns, Hate, and “You”

  23. The movies released by Hollywood have to be money makers for them to even get publicity. So even though this movie may not be amazing, the attitude that people will come out en masse to suppor an all-black cast movie will make the executives take notice so that there are more opportunities for quality movies in the future.

    In addition, white people are more attracted to a brand when it comes to movies. So even though Sherlock Holmes sucked, it was well received because of the A-list celebrities cast in the film (Downey, Jr., McAdams, Law). As faithful fans they will flock in throes to support their celebrity. Hollywood knows this is and this the development of Sherlock Holmes 2 coming soon to a theater near you.

    In the same way that black people have buying power when it comes to merchandise and hair care products, we also need to show the same type of authority when it comes to our movies.

    I for one also already bought tickets for Sunday, and I’m going with two friends. It’s important to show that you will support the larger picture even if you’re skeptical of one individual product.

  24. I feel you, Slim. I do. But, I've wasted money on far less important things, lol. And I didn't go to the Million Woman/Family March. So, I'm kinda behind with doing my share as a part of "the struggle", lol. If I regret the money I spend, I'll second guess myself next time (if there is one, lol).

    I can understand waiting for feedback though. However, I've def enjoyed movies that others haven't. *shrugs*

    At least go see a matinee showing, lol…save a few dollars…

  25. Here's some of my major issues with the movie…

    1) Stop saying nobody knows about the Tuskegee Airmen, or that they were left out of the Civil Rights movement. First of all, white people don't give a sh*t about the Tuskegee airmen, and by now, Black people know. So who doesn't know who the Tuskegee airmen are? Nnnnnn…..

    2) You can't put Terrence Howard and Cuba Gooding, Jr. in a movie, it's just a recipe for cheesy lines.

    3) Can't imagine a love story worth seeing, it's a war movie. I hope ain't nobody getting down like that, womun and chil'ren was at home at this time.

    4) I got this Four Brothers skepticism about this movie. Sounds good on paper, like let's go support the big homie John Singleton and Andre 3K and Tyrese and honorary n*gga Mark Wahlberg… but then… I saw it at a screening and I was like, "For all the hype around this, it was some bullsh*t." And here's what happens when Hollywood tries to go mainstream with Black movies, they do something inherently racist that ends up pissing Black people all the way off. Remember how in Four Brothers people kept asking, "Why couldn't the mother be Black?" I mean, we all know that Singleton just has problems with showing Black women in positions of power. But that's what I mean, they do something that's inherently racist on so many levels.

    Here's why i'm going to see it:

    1) Sh*t look hot, man. Why not?

    2) And I always thought Daniela Ruah was passing, looking forward to seeing what could happen in this movie.

    1. Just a note: some of us who immigrated to this country aren't inherently knowledgeable regarding some of the specifics of US history. I went to HS and JHS here, but at that point in my life, I honestly didn't care. History bores me, so I didn't pay attention in class during Black Hx Month any more than I did during the rest of the year. And in college, although some of my Soc classes touched on Black Hx, it (again) didn't interest me. So, for me, this has a (very slight, I admit) chance of teaching me something. And if it teaches me, it might teach some of the random White peeps who go see it because it looks good.

      Also, I agree with your statement: "Sh*t look hot, man. Why not?" That's my main reason to go see it.

      1. I feel you. But we got to figure out how to address the next generation saying things like, "history didn't appeal to me." Knowledge has to appeal to children. When they get to college they can pick a major, but not in grade school. They need to absorb all that information.

    2. "1) Stop saying nobody knows about the Tuskegee Airmen, or that they were left out of the Civil Rights movement. First of all, white people don't give a sh*t about the Tuskegee airmen, and by now, Black people know. So who doesn't know who the Tuskegee airmen are? Nnnnnn….. '"

      Alot of black ppl know who they are but there are many (mostly young folk) who dont really understand the history,struggle and importance of tht Tuskegee Airmen. Sometimes we assume that everyone should know b/c we know and thats not always the case. Plus just because black ppl know who the Tuskegee airman are does'nt mean we should'nt spred this knowledge to other races. This action movie will hopefully attract ppl from all backgrounds to come see it even if it just based on War action. hopefully ppl come to see the action but leave out with a little bit of history.

      1. What are you talking about man? Your point was to just find something to disagree with? You can't be serious thinking that. Yes, there are a small subset of Black people who don't know. And your comment was under the premise that I think folks shouldn't leave with history. And then the end of my comment it was clear I was going to see it. I don't like replies where it's like, "let me find something to debate out of this comment."

      2. A lot is also two words. Just throwing that out there. My mother got on me about that as a child, but not everybody's the same.

        1. Listen you made a point I made a point and I never said anything about you not going to see it. I don't care if you see it or not. I'm just saying you can't completely say everyone knows about them so thats not a reason to go see the movie. Regardless if 100 ppl dont know or if just one person its does'nt matter. And yes Im serious about my point this movie is not just for adults there are a lot of children/teens who dont know the history behind the Tuskgee Airmen or just know the surface stuff. So yes for them this could be a reason to go see the movie.

          And for the second comment Im writing from my iphone sorry I did not take the time out to put the space between a and lot. I'm writing on a blog did'nt think it was that serious.

  26. Honestly, I hadn't even heard about this movie until I saw this post this morning. I want to see it though. I don't normally like war movies but the Tuskegee Airmen are legends so why not? Plus Ne-yo's hairline…gots to see it so I can get my laugh on.

    1. Girl, why did I look at one of the posters, see Ne-yo's azz sitting up their (with a hat, of course) and just bust out laughing. I wonder how many lines their gonna give Ne-yo's hairline, it's a character all by itself.

  27. Well I am just gone go ahead and say it. I am disappointed to see this article. I felt the tone was sort of negative overall and even tho I do think there was attempts to make it slightly hopeful it just rubs me wrong when we as black ppl always find the negative in anything black. Personally I would of rather seen something positive and then after you see it giving your opinion. Yes I do think its almost a cancer in our culture to expect the worse from ourselves. What I hate most is if someone goes into a small business owned by any other race and its bad service or product they blame those business owners and say they really need to get their sh*t together. But don't let it be black owned cause it spurs a whole other type conversation on the state of our race why we cant do nothing right and on and on and on. That frustrates me to no end.

    1. Furthermore, yes I plan on seeing it for a number of reasons one I am descendant of a Tuskegee Airman so it holds a special meaning for me. Two I was raised that you support your own kind cause if you don't who will. And yes this sometimes means supporting a product that might not be up to par yet. But before anyone huffs and puffs. Most start up companies have limited funds and that beginning support is crucial to help them reach the next level. I have had a start up its rough. Everyone wants on board when you are on top but those beginning stages (long sigh) are tough with a capital T. Will I keep supporting someone that places out an inferioir product cause their black?? Heck no, but I will count myself as one of their beginning supporters it will be up to them after that to maintain my business. C, I usually enjoy historical movies and these dumb on top of dumb movies are starting to take over and while I enjoy a good laugh something thought provoking would be a breathe of fresh air.

      1. Lastly, I wanted to reference this whole they won't make anymore films for or about us sounds like bull and part of me feels its mostly propaganda <–i think thats the word I should use but correct me if I am wrong. Historically films based on any historical matters don't do as well in the box office. I mean lets just face the facts I just hopped off of IMDB and the highest grossing US film was Avatar (760 mil) and you did'nt see anything with any sort of historical reference on the list until Passion of The Christ which was number 16 (370 mil). Amistad only did 44 mil and Remember The Titans 115 mil. In the scheme of things we are minorities and so the numbers will reflect that and thats fine. We won't become irrelevant b/c we would never allow it. But I am not expecting any whopping numbers in the box office b/c this is geared toward us an history buffs and truth be told when most ppl go to the theater they just want an enjoyable time and to leave their realities behind them.

  28. My pleasure! To be honest, I was (and still am) in class and thinking in HR terms as well. lol

    I hope studying is coming along well. =)

  29. Well, we don't do the movie theaters too much around here, but I suspect we'll hit it up on Redbox. The hubs is an Airforce man and he loves anything regarding Blacks in the armed forces and specifically the Tuskeegee Airmen. When Obama was elected he was chosen to escort one of the last living Airmen at the inauguration – that bamma was floating on cloud nine, I think it was a bigger deal to him than the election of the first Black president.

  30. Havent read all the comments but lemme tell you a story

    There was a laundromat in my hood. A nice lil ole black lady owned it. She was the sweetest thing on this here earth *southern voice* She was kind and the laundry got done. There were many problems with it (too small, people would OD on reserving machines. mad money to buy detergent there, broken machines, she opened the shop whenever etc). but I didnt stop supporting because she was one of my own and I wanted to support small business.

    2 yrs ago, a 24 hour laundromat set up shop right next door. I told myself I wouldn't jump ship like Jordan to Kobe to LeBron fans, so I kept supporting. In the face of competition, the business practices didnt improve at all. I dealt with the same ish and she could care less, as she was keeping her customers and rode off of loyalty. I made the power switch and didnt look back. She tried to offer some swindle deals, but 2 yrs later her laundromat is a bodega owned by Ock, Ali and the Arabs.

    Point of the story? Just because we have similar stories doesn't mean I wont get tired of hearing it and supporting it blindly. Demand excellence not reverence
    My recent post Streetztalk Deals: SilBlade Premium Windshield Wipers

  31. Slim: Let’s make sure we’re supporting it because we expect it to be good and not just because it’s black and needs our support.

    I understand that we’re trying to pave a road, but we need to remember that it’s coated with more than melanin. It’s coated with high expectations, potential, and hard work. Whatever the case, I hope this movie does well. The price is high and I’d hate to see our collective Hollywood stock drop.

    I'm seeing Red Tails this weekend or eventually. Contrary to your comment, I will be supporting it because it's black and needs our support. I make no qualms about that. Truthfully, the trailers havent moved me one way or the other. The movie doesnt look bad but it doesnt look great either. As Cheekz said earlier, you really only have to "live, pay taxes and die" and you are free to make your own decision. "You" being anyone. My decision has been to see and support the movie because as others have said, if I dont support people who look like me, then who will?

    Others have mentioned this but the movie, whether folks like it or not, is geared towards a black audience. Black people only represent 15% of this country anyway, so I dont expect to see high dollar sales at the box office. If that's what people are hoping for they are setting themselves up for failure. My much more hopeful and reasonable expectation is that the movie receives good reviews and is regarded as a good movie by myself and others regardless of the color of the cast. THAT would make ME happy.

  32. Idk. I'm torn. This is what I put on the FB the other day: I feel some type of way about George Lucas trying to shame me into seeing a movie. I feel like he's low key saying, "if you Negroes don't go see Red Tails, you'll be left with Tyler Perry fare for the REST OF YOUR LIVES!!!!"

    But having said that, I admire people like my mom and folks in her generation who support all black everything. I mean not like DVDs sold @ the beauty salon but if it makes it to a theater (movie or otherwise) or on her television screen – well my mom is watching and boosting the ratings.This doesn't mean that she always loves it and there's no room for critique, but she gives it a chance to succeed or fail or be totally mediocre…but maybe it will open doors for more people to do more things? I don't know but I respect that woman's commitment!
    My recent post Divine Intervention

  33. I expect it to be good… yet I also know the ramifications for future "black films" if this one *with George's Lucas' name on it" does not succeed.

    Does it look to be epic, "no." Yet it looks more interesting than most of the stuff that's been released these days.

    But what do I know, the last times I went to the movies was to see Dreamgirls in 2006.
    My recent post Rejected

  34. Since we're on the topic, please support Of Boys and Men. You may have already seen it on BET, but it's available on Netflix and for purchase in Walmart. Close friends of mine (Black people) produced and directed this film. One of the producers is Robert Townsend. The writer is a Black woman and it has a Black cast starring Angela Bassett. They wanted the film to have a major theatrical release. They dealt with the "Hollywood" struggle for a few years facing opposition even with an Academy Award nominated actress attached to the project.

  35. I plan to see it not because of the poor/good quality of it, and not because I'm supporting a (sort of) black movie. Mainly, I want to see it to support and promote the telling of the Tuskegee Airmen story. This is a unique and admirable point in black/American history that is probably not well known to most of the masses.

    In that respect, I like the way it is being marketed. From what I've seen, it's being sold as an action movie, something that men of all stripes will drag their girlfriends of all stripes to see, and at the end of the day maybe a few people will learn something. And the education of people about black history is always something I will support.

  36. Making movie that conveys the African American experience needs to be supported. Financially backing films such as this would garner interest from groups of people who may have never had an interest from the beginning. If there is a demand for these stories, more will get made and our story will become apart of America's conscious.

  37. Anthony Mackie. Know who he is? Most folks don't. He co-starred as Sgt. JT Sandborn in the Oscar Winning film "The Hurt Locker."

    Where was he for this movie? I'm not saying that Terrance Howard can't act (cause he's obviously another good Actor), but c'mon. We all know this was a bone.

    As soon as I heard Lucas was putting money up and pimping this movie, I figured the "Let's go support our people" emails would be follwoing (which I've gotten bunches already).

    Then, I heard Aaron McGruder was doing the screenplay for this movie. For some odd reason, couldn't get the picture of me going to see this movie and hearing Mo Gunz out of my mind (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS1ozeyaFN4)

    If you want to make an action movie – make it that. An action movie. But don't base it on some of the mose heroic Africian Americans that ever lived!

  38. It might not be appropriate for those who did not see the movie (but i include no spoilers) but I have and my before and after is as follows:

    Before:
    I'm not into action movies. I need a plot, thought provoking characters, moving monologues, tear-jerking sublimal messages, or just a good laugh. As such I was not, I repeat, not excited to see Red Tails. But I saw mission impossible 4 a month ago- pure action, no dialogue, predictable, Tom Cruise jumps off building, barely lIves and then does jumping jacks through lasers-I saw it because I've seen all the other installments but nothing more. Tho I expected Red Tails would have all the nothing that MI-4 had, it in truth actually deserves my money–because Tom Cruise can make a bad movie and we will still go because its effin Tom Cruise even tho we know what to expect, as opposed to 'Black' movies who dont even get the chance to be bad before everyone rights them off….

    After:
    Action movies are still not my thing. But the untold stories of those fighting for what I take for granted everyday-I'm a sucker for. I will always be a proponent of doing that which all others said was impossible for you to do simply because they cant dream as big as you. Oscar-no, History-yes. And by buying my ticket I was part of that.

    (yah, me! this is my second time commenting!)

  39. I'm pretty much on board w/ those of you who said they didn't respect the swindle from George Lucas. When you have a solid movie that'll win people over (regardless of race) w/ its story and acting talents, you don't need to pull the guilt trip. So from his appearance on the Daily Show, I didn't have as high hopes as I did back in December.

    For me, part of the problem is the cast. A good friend of mine auditioned for this 2.5 years ago, but that role was later given to Elijah Kelley. To be able to pull major numbers at the box office opening weekend as a "black" movie, you have to have actors that people know and can put some stock in. Nate Parker is a pretty dope actor (loved him in Great Debaters), but the rest of the guys haven't done any outstanding work (I glazed over IMDb and most of the Airmen are being portrayed by TV actors – a very different medium than film). I mean, why wasn't Columbus Short considered for this? Or Cory Hardrict? I remember my boy telling me that the casting directors specifically wanted youthful looking actors for this film. So to fit such a stringent mold, we have to sit through 2 hrs of NeYo and Moesha's lil brother??? -_- Nahhhhh

    I'll see it just because I hate to prejudged a film. But I'm in a no hurry. It's way too many talented black filmmakers out here to support organically and willfully, for me to be guilted into supporting a white producer who is all but pandering for his own pockets.
    My recent post Obligatory Support Doesn’t Get “Black” Films Made

  40. I think the movie looks like a good movie and I like the subject matter.
    I do agree with you Slim. We should support quality black goods and services….Not just because they are black.
    I used to work in a Day Spa as an Esthetician. I've worked in Black owned spa's as well as white owned spa's. I went to a black owned Spa as a patron and it was terrible. I tried to be supportive because I was in the business also and tried to support "my people's." But I will not subject myself to bad service just for the sake of supporting "my people's."
    I have never expected anyone to support me either in my business just because I'm black. In the past I've refused business if I knew I couldn't give the very best quality of service because I didn't have the proper equipment or whatever. At the end of the day everyone wants good service and they want to feel like they got their monies worth whether your black, white, chinese, indian or whatever. Especially in the U.S. at the end of the day the color that trumps black, white and all the other colors is Green.

  41. I saw the movie last weekend. A lot of my listeners were "geeked up" over it, so I made it my mission to check it out on opening day. I thought it was a big, fun, sensationalized war movie. Some would argue that the movie could have used more "grounding" in the drama of the real life racial struggles that the men endured. However, I think that's what the original HBO "The Tuskegee Airmen" movie did.

    I think it was WAAAAAYYYY past time that they showed a more flashy, over-the-top version of our heroics on the world stage. Every ethnic group has it's heroes that are portrayed as larger than life, so I just look at this as finally being one for "us".

    What's just as important as the movie itself are the life lessons of endurance, guts, skill, excellence, and self-respect that the movie teaches us.

    Victory Unlimited
    My recent post Mission #25 – Objective: Red Tails: 5 Life Lessons That The Tuskegee Airmen Movie Can Teach You!

  42. I also initially felt like bleekgiliam, "i personally became skeptical of "supporting" red tail just bc i feel like i'm being forced/ordered to go see it. "

    People had been telling me to see it without even telling me what it was about. Once I learned it was a positive portrayal of the Tuskeegee Airmen I went to see it. While I can't say its in my top five I enjoyed the story line and action scenes. It was a good high quality movie.

    Totally agree with Kriola on this
    "So while it may not be the best movie ever it does tell the story of the Tuskegee Airmen who are a huge source of pride for the Black community. I am hoping that by supporting this film it will encourage others to make ones like it, Hollywood to support others like it and show the youth and other races/cultures that we have more than just rappers and athletes to look up to.
    ….And it doesn't hurt that Nate Parker and Micheal B. Jordan are in the movie."

  43. What people don't seem to get is that it doesn't matter if we (black folks) see it or not…it won't move Hollywood to make more films with black casts. Tyler Perry has been able to make movies because he has proven that BLACK FOLKS will support his films in big numbers; however, his films are supported primarily ONLY by black folks. So although his films are sure to make money, due to the low budgets and "guaranteed' black support the studios "green light" his films, BUT they are distributed by the lesser of the studio's distribution companies (there is a hierarchy of distribution companies, Perry's films are released by the lower rung company. YOU WON'T SEE FILMS WITH ALL BLACK CASTS UNTIL WHITE AMERICA STARTS PAYING TO SEE FILMS WITH ALL BLACK CASTS! So although the "drive" to get all us black folks to the theater to support this film to "show" the studios there's money in them, like Tyler Perry has, the truth is Hollywood is ALREADY ASSUMING we will see it …BUT they're ALSO ASSUMING that NO ONE ELSE WILL PAY TO SEE IT! So instead of telling every black person you know to see the film, you need to get EVERY WHITE PERSON YOU KNOW to see the film…THEN you'll see the change you're looking for.

  44. What people don't seem to get is that it doesn't matter if we (black folks) see it or not…it won't move Hollywood to make more films with black casts. Tyler Perry has been able to make movies because he has proven that BLACK FOLKS will support his films in big number. However…there are not enough of us to make a film a REAL blockbuster .Perry's films are supported primarily (some would argue exclusively) by black folks consequently, they'll always make money because he operates with a low budget (relative to a typical Hollywood film) and there are enough loyal fans to assure a certain box office. Hollywood's position is that NO ONE ELSE will pay to see a film with an all black cast. Until THAT is proven untrue, nothing will change in that regard. So instead of encouraging every black person you know to go see the movie, encourage every WHITE/NON BLACK person you know to see the movie…THAT IS WHAT WILL GET THE STUDIOS TO CHANGE. Until then, it doesn't matter how many of us go and see it…that's what they expected when they green lit the film. Another '"strike" against black films is that they feel there is no market for them internationally, which is HUGELY important in today's Hollywood. Despite Perry's 7 successful films, it wasn't until last year that Lionsgate decided to release one internationally, in the UK. These guys make decisions based on dollars and cents; consequently, they do their research. If their research/focus groups indicated America was clamoring for an all black cast, they'd be flying in black actor/actresses from everywhere they could find them. What it really is, unfortunately, is a mirror as to who the American movie public REALLY IS.

  45. What people don't seem to get is that it doesn't matter if we (black folks) see it or not…it won't move Hollywood to make more films with black casts. Tyler Perry has been able to make movies because he has proven that BLACK FOLKS will support his films in big number. However…there are not enough of us to make a film a REAL blockbuster .Perry's films are supported primarily (some would argue exclusively) by black folks consequently, they'll always make money because he operates with a low budget (relative to a typical Hollywood film) and there are enough loyal fans to assure a certain box office. Hollywood's position is that NO ONE ELSE will pay to see a film with an all black cast. Until THAT is proven untrue, nothing will change in that regard. So instead of encouraging every black person you know to go see the movie, encourage every WHITE/NON BLACK person you know to see the movie…THAT IS WHAT WILL GET THE STUDIOS TO CHANGE. Until then, it doesn't matter how many of us go and see it…that's what they expected when they green lit the film. Another '"strike" against black films is that they feel there is no market for them internationally, which is HUGELY important in today's Hollywood. Despite Perry's 7 successful films, it wasn't until last year that Lionsgate decided to release one internationally, in the UK. These guys make decisions based on dollars and cents

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